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Creationism: Still crazy after all these years

Eugenie C. ScottEugenie C. Scott

Now available on NCSE's YouTube channel: Eugenie C. Scott's "Creationism: Still crazy after all these years," a presentation at the 2009 Atheist Alliance International conference in Burbank, California. Scott describes the evolving history of the antievolution movement in the United States, from attempts to balance the teaching of evolution with "creation science" or "intelligent design" to the present spate of stealth creationist tactics such as "academic freedom" and (in Texas) "all sides of scientific evidence."

Welcome to ncse.com

NCSE is now using ncse.com — shorter and easier to remember than ncseweb.org — as its primary domain name. The change is already in effect on NCSE's website and e-mail. But never fear: links and e-mail to ncseweb.org will be automatically forwarded to ncse.com.

NCSE is grateful to Jeff Bennett, president and chief operating officer of NameMedia, Inc., for extending a substantial discount on the ncse.com domain. Said Bennett, "We understand that you are a non-profit organization with a big mission." It's a mission that you can support by joining or renewing today — at ncse.com.

NCSE members celebrating Origin Day

Adding to the recent celebrations of the sesquicentennial anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species on November 24, 1859, were three members of NCSE, writing for their local newspapers.

New videos of Eugenie C. Scott on-line

Eugenie C. ScottEugenie C. Scott

Videos of two recent events featuring NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott are now available on-line. First, from WOSU Public Media in Columbus, Ohio, there's "In the Beginning — Explanations from Science and Religion," a panel discussion featuring Scott, Francisco Ayala, and Denis O. Lamoureux, hosted by National Public Radio's Neal Conan. Second, from the American Humanist Association in Washington DC, there's "Evolution v. Creationism: The Politics, the Science, the Debate," a panel discussion featuring Scott, Barbara Forrest, and Kenneth R. Miller. Tune in and enjoy!

NCSE's Scott tackles creationist Origin

NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott was invited to debate Ray Comfort, a creationist in the news recently for his plans to distribute copies of the Origin of Species with his own introduction, on the God & Country blog of U.S. News & World Report.

Ray Comfort is bananas

US News and World Report logo

NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott takes aim at creationist Ray Comfort's distorted views on evolution in a special debate taking place on the U.S. News & World Report site. The debate centers on Comfort's 54-page introduction to a "special" edition of Darwin's On the Origin of Species that will be given away on college campuses across America, starting November 19.

Norman Levitt dies

Norman LevittNorman Levitt

Norman Levitt, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Rutgers University and a fierce critic of pseudoscience, died on October 23, 2009, in New York City, according to the obituary in eSkeptic (October 26, 2009).

Genie grants SciAm's wishes

NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott is on the revamped and expanded Board of Advisers of Scientific American, announced in the magazine's November 2009 issue.

Ten Myths about Charles Darwin

Kevin PadianKevin Padian

Kevin Padian discusses — and debunks — "Ten Myths about Charles Darwin" in the October 2009 issue of BioScience. "Charles Darwin is one of the most revered (and at times reviled) figures in Western history. A great many 'facts' about him and his ideas are the stuff of textbook myths, others are inaccuracies spread by antievolutionists, and still others are conventional historical mistakes long corrected but still repeated," he writes.

Kilosteve t-shirts now available

At last, the latest iteration of NCSE's pioneering experimental steveometry apparatus — the Project Steve t-shirt — is available for order! The names of the first 1099 signatories to Project Steve are printed in white on a quality cotton/poly black t-shirt, along with the slogan, "Over 1000 scientists named Steve agree.

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