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Brian Alters discusses evolution and education at NIH


On May 10, 2006, Brian Alters delivered a lecture on "Evolution and Education" in the National Institute of Health's Evolution and Medicine lecture series, presented by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, the Office of Science Education, and the National Human Genome Research Institute. His lecture is now available on-line to view in RealPlayer format.

Stanford Medicine: "The Evolutionary War"


"The Evolutionary War" is the theme of the summer 2006 issue of Stanford Medicine. Unsurprisingly, the magazine emphasizes evolution and medicine. "Darwin in Medical School" discusses the efforts, led by Randolph Nesse of the University of Michigan, to incorporate evolution in medical school curricula. "Evolution offers a broad framework on which you can organize and understand all kinds of facts and principles," Nesse comments.

"Intelligent Judging"


Featured in the May 25, 2006, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine is George J. Annas's article "Intelligent Judging -- Evolution in the Classroom and the Courtroom." Annas distinguishes three waves of activity seeking "to banish or marginalize the teaching of evolution" in the public schools: attempts to ban the teaching of evolution, attempts to teach "creation science" alongside evolution, and attempts to teach "intelligent design" alongside evolution.

"The vigil after Dover"


A public forum -- "Keeping science and religion separate in schools: The vigil after Dover" -- held at Florida State University on May 17, 2006, is now available on-line. Participating were NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott, Georgetown University theologian John F. Haught and Michigan State University philosopher Robert T. Pennock (both of whom testified as expert witnesses for the plaintiffs in Kitzmiller v.

"Evolution's bottom line"


In his op-ed "Evolution's bottom line," published in The New York Times (May 12, 2006), Holden Thorp emphasizes the practical applications of evolution, writing, "creationism has no commercial application. Evolution does," and citing several specific examples.

Scientific Illiteracy and the Partisan Takeover of Biology

A new article in PLoS Biology (April 18, 2006) discusses the state of scientific literacy in the United States, with especial attention to the survey research of Jon D.

 

National Council of Churches statement on teaching evolution


The National Council of Churches Committee on Public Education and Literacy recently issued a statement (PDF) on "Science, Religion, and the Teaching of Evolution in Public School Classes," intended "to assist people of faith who experience no conflict between science and religion and who embrace science as one way of appreciating the beauty and complexity of God's creation" as they consider the issues surrounding the teaching of evolution. The statement addresses four questions: "What is science?

Biogeographers add their voice for evolution


The Biogeography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers adopted a strong statement on the teaching of evolution on November 1, 2005.

On the Front Lines


In "On the Front Lines in the War Over Evolution," in the March 10, 2006, issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education, Richard Monastersky reports on recent efforts to rally the scientific community to support evolution education -- "to recruit new troops," as he puts it, "for the escalating war against creationism and its spinoff doctrine, intelligent design."

Henry Morris dies


Henry Morris, the founder of the "creation science" movement, died on February 25, 2006, in Santee, California, at the age of 87. Speaking to The New York Times (March 4, 2006), NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott described him as "the most important creationist of the 20th century, much more so than William Jennings Bryan." And the historian Edward J.

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