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NCSE's Scott to be honored by UCSF


NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott is to receive the UCSF Medal, the highest award of the University of California, San Francisco, on April 23, 2008. In a letter to Scott, the university's chancellor J. Michael Bishop wrote, "The award is offered in recognition of your distinguished advocacy on behalf of science in the public arena.

Newest Templeton Prize winner rejects "intelligent design"


The recipient of the 2008 Templeton Prize for Progress Toward Research or Discoveries about Spiritual Realities was Michael Heller, a Polish cosmologist and Catholic priest, currently Professor in the Faculty of Philosophy at the Pontifical Academy of Theology in Krakow. John M.

First Freedom First simulcast: March 26


"Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Separation of Church and State ... but Were Afraid to Ask!" -- a national simulcast sponsored by First Freedom First, a joint project of Americans United for Separation of Church and State and The Interfaith Alliance Foundation -- is coming to theaters around the country on March 26, 2008.

NCSE's Scott to be honored by the University of New Mexico


NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott is to receive the honorary degree of Doctor of Science from the University of New Mexico on May 17, 2008. In a letter to Scott, the university's president David J. Schmidly wrote, "This degree is a reflection of the high regard in which you are held and acknowledgement of the vast accomplishments you have made in your career."

Malcolm McKenna dies


Malcolm McKenna, a retired curator of vertebrate paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History and a Supporter of NCSE, died on March 3, 2008, in Boulder, Colorado, according to the obituary in The New York Times (March 10, 2008). Born on July 21, 1930, in Pomona, California, he attended the California Institute of Technology and Pomona College, before graduating in paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley, where he also earned his Ph.D.

The second issue of Evolution: Education and Outreach


The second issue of Evolution: Education and Outreach -- the new journal aspiring to promote accurate understanding and comprehensive teaching of evolutionary theory for a wide audience -- is now available on-line.

William F. Buckley Jr. dies


William F. Buckley Jr., widely considered to be the father of the modern conservative movement, died on February 27, 2008, at the age of 82 in Stamford, Connecticut, according to The New York Times's obituary (February 27, 2008). Born in New York City in 1925, Buckley served in the Army from 1944 to 1946 before entering Yale University, from which he graduated in 1950.

ISSR adds its voice for evolution

 

The International Society for Science and Religion recently adopted a statement on the concept of "intelligent design," describing it as "neither sound science nor good theology." The statement continues, "Although the boundaries of science are open to change, allowing supernatural explanations to count as science undercuts the very purpose of science, which is to explain the workings of nature without recourse to religious language.

 

Padian on Darwin's enduring legacy


Preparing for the impending bicentennial of Darwin's birth, the journal Nature (451: 632-634) commissioned Kevin Padian to consider (subscription required) Darwin's enduring legacy.

American Geophysical Union adds its voice for evolution

 

The American Geophysical Union reaffirmed its support for teaching evolution in December 2007, when it adopted a revised version of its Biological Evolution and the History of the Earth Are Foundations of Science statement. The statement begins, "AGU affirms the central importance of including scientific theories of Earth history and biological evolution in science education.

 

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