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Legislation fails to progress


Two evolution-related measures have failed to progress through the Montana legislature and are dead for this session. March 1 was the deadline for bills to pass in their first house. One potential bill, known by its draft number of LC1199, was never formally introduced. Sponsored by Rep. Roger Koopman, the bill had a short title reading: "Allow teaching competing theories of origin". This bill apparently never completed the drafting process.

Duelling legislation in the Treasure State


Following last year's debate over evolution education in the small Montana town of Darby, two bills have been proposed in the Montana legislature which take diametrically opposed stands on the place of evolution in the science classrooms of the state's public schools.

Darby board rejects "objective origins"

On July 5, 2004, the school board in Darby, Montana voted 3-2 not to adopt a proposed "objective origins policy" on its second reading. The policy had been tentatively approved on February 2 at its first reading, but is now rejected. The proposal sparked intense local controversy and national media attention earlier this year. The fate of the policy became the central issue in the May school board election, where two policy supporters were decisively defeated by opponents, resulting in the change in board majority from "pro" to "anti".

Pro-science candidates triumph in Montana

After the May 4, 2004, school board election in Darby, Montana, the proposed "objective origins" policy is likely to be dead in the water.

Helena censorship attempt fails

Roxanne Cleasby, a parent in Helena, Montana, was attempting to have a book about horses (Juliet Clutton-Brock's Horse) removed from her local elementary school library because it devotes two pages to discussing equine evolution.

Censorship attempt in Helena school library

A parent in Helena, Montana, is attempting to have a book about horses removed from her local elementary school library because it devotes two pages to discussing equine evolution.

Montana House Bill 588

House Bill 588 was introduced in the state legislature in February 2001, and referred to the State Administration Committee. On February 19 it was heard in committee, and tabled by a 14–4 vote.

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