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Matzke's Kitzmas tree!

Figure from "The Evolution of Antievolution Policies After Kitzmiller v. Dover"

In a new paper (PDF; subscription required) forthcoming in Science, Nick Matzke shows that even though creationism is getting stealthier in the wake of legal defeats such as Kitzmiller v. Dover, techniques from modern evolutionary biology reveal how creationist legislation is evolving. Using data collected by NCSE and state-of-the-art phylogenetic analysis, Matzke constructed a phylogenetic tree of seventy-five distinct antievolution bills and policies, reconstructing their genealogical relationships with a high degree of confidence.

Climate change amendment in the House

Matt CartwrightMatt Cartwright

A measure that would have acknowledged "the overwhelming scientific consensus that climate change is real" was rejected in the U.S. House of Representatives on December 3, 2015, according to The Hill (December 3, 2015).

Extending summer vacation for the sake of creationism?

Will Kentucky extend the duration of summer vacation in order to enable students to attend a creationist attraction?

No Senate resolution on climate education

Edward MarkeyEdward Markey

When the United States Senate passed the Every Child Achieves Act of 2015 on July 16, 2015, a proposed resolution acknowledging the scientific evidence for climate change and affirming the importance of climate science education was not included.

Update from the Senate

Seal of the United States SenateTwo of the three amendments concerning climate change education under consideration are out of commission as the United States Senate continues to discuss a bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

Climate change education in the Senate

Seal of the United States SenateClimate change education is suddenly under discussion in the United States Senate, the National Journal (July 9, 2015) reports, with the introduction of dueling amendments to a bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

Antiscience bill dies in Alabama

Alabama's House Bill 592 (PDF) died in committee in the Alabama House of Representatives on June 4, 2015, when the legislative session ended. The bill would have encouraged teachers and students to "debate the strengths and weaknesses of the theory of evolution in public schools across Alabama," reported the Anniston Star (May 7, 2015).

Creationism revealed in Louisiana schools, continued

"We will read in Genesis and them [sic] some supplemental material debunking various aspects of evolution from which the student will present." So wrote a Louisiana science teacher to her principal, as quoted by Zack Kopplin, writing in Slate (June 2, 2015).

Antievolution bill dies in Missouri

Missouri's House Bill 486 (PDF) died in committee in the Missouri House of Representatives on May 15, 2015, when the legislature adjourned. 

Update from Alabama

"Teachers and students could soon find themselves free to debate the strengths and weaknesses of the theory of evolution in public schools across Alabama if a bill introduced to the House this month becomes law," reported the Anniston Star (May 7, 2015), referring to House Bill 592 (PDF).

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