Kentucky

09.16.2013

The decision in Kentucky to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards was editorially praised by the Louisville Courier-Journal (September 15, 2013).

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As a few commenters were quick to guess yesterday, a subcommittee of the Kentucky legislature did indeed vote to block adoption of Next Generation Science Standards. On a 5-1 vote, the Administrative Regulation Review Subcommittee sought to overrule the Kentucky Board of Education. The subcommittee tried to wipe away all the hard work that Kentucky’s teachers and scientists invested in creating these standards, along with top scientists and teachers from across the country.

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09.11.2013

On September 11, 2013, Kentucky's governor Steve Beshear announced that he "plans to implement the new Kentucky Next Generation Standards under his own authority," as the Lexington Herald-Leader (September 11, 2013) reports.

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09.11.2013

Despite the recommendation of the Kentucky Department of Education and the Kentucky Board of Education, a legislative committee voted not to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards for the state.

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In June 2013, the Kentucky board of education voted to approve new statewide science standards. Kentucky was one of 26 states that helped draft the Next Generation Science Standards, so it was little surprise that the board adopted those standards easily. Kansas and Rhode Island had already adopted the same standards, and Vermont, Maryland, and California have all done the same since then. Before long, dozens of states are likely to do the same.

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Kids reacting to a Tyrannosaurus rexBack in June 2013, a low-level employee of the Cincinnati Museum Center was reprimanded for publicly scoffing at Answers in Genesis’s Creation “Museum”—across the Ohio River from Cincinnati—and complaining that it isn’t a proper museum at all.

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08.08.2013

The Kentucky Board of Education declined to make any changes to a proposed regulation that would enact the Next Generation Science Standards as Kentucky's state science standards, despite the protests of evolution deniers and climate change deniers.

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01.14.2013

"Teach evolution as the fact it is," a column by NCSE's deputy director Glenn Branch, appeared in the Louisville Courier-Journal (January 13, 2013).

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12.13.2012

The new chair of the Kentucky Senate Standing Committee on Education "has no intention of using his new role to help push his personal belief in creationism into the curriculum of public schools," reports the Louisville Courier-Journal (December 12, 2012).

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