You are here

NCSE's Branch on evolution in Kentucky

"Teach evolution as the fact it is," a column by NCSE's deputy director Glenn Branch, appeared in the Louisville Courier-Journal (January 13, 2013).

Creationist restraint in Kentucky

The new chair of the Kentucky Senate Standing Committee on Education "has no intention of using his new role to help push his personal belief in creationism into the curriculum of public schools," reports the Louisville Courier-Journal (December 12, 2012).

Kentucky legislators assailing evolution

Legislators in the Kentucky state senate are concerned about the presence of evolution in the state science standards and associated end-of-course testing.

County school superintendent blasts evolution

The superintendent of the school system in Hart County, Kentucky, is complaining about the emphasis on evolution in the state's new end-of-course test for biology, according to the Lexington Herald-Leader (December 13, 2011).

The New York Times on the ark park

The New York Times offered its view on Kentucky's decision to grant tax incentives to Ark Encounter, the proposed creationist theme park in northern Kentucky.

Kentucky to grant tax incentives to ark park

The Kentucky Tourism Development Finance Authority voted unanimously on May 19, 2011, to grant tax incentives to Ark Encounter, according to the Associated Press (May 19, 2011). Ark Encounter is the proposed creationist theme park in northern Kentucky.

Antievolution bill dies in Kentucky

When the Kentucky legislature adjourned sine die on March 9, 2011, House Bill 169 died in committee.

Settlement in the Gaskell case

A settlement was reached in C. Martin Gaskell v. University of Kentucky, and the parties are moving for a dismissal of the lawsuit.

Kentucky Academy of Science on the ark park

Concern over Ark Encounter, the proposed creationist theme park in northern Kentucky was expressed by two guest editorials in the January 2011 issue of the newsletter of the Kentucky Academy of Science.

Antievolution legislation in Kentucky

Kentucky's House Bill 169 would, if enacted, allow teachers to "use, as permitted by the local school board, other instructional materials to help students understand, analyze, critique, and review scientific theories in an objective manner."

Pages

Subscribe to Kentucky