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Vacation creationism bill dies in Kentucky

Kentucky's Senate Bill 50 (PDF) died in the House Education Committee when the legislature adjourned on April 15, 2016. The bill would have extended the duration of summer vacation in the state's public schools in order to boost tourism — including to a creationist attraction. 

Vacation creationism bill introduced in Kentucky

A bill introduced in the Kentucky legislature would extend the duration of summer vacation in order to boost tourism — including to a creationist attraction. 

Extending summer vacation for the sake of creationism?

Will Kentucky extend the duration of summer vacation in order to enable students to attend a creationist attraction?

No tax incentives for ark park

"Kentucky's Tourism Arts & Heritage Cabinet Secretary Bob Stewart informed representatives of the proposed Ark Encounter tourist attraction today that their project will not be eligible for up to $18 million in tax incentives from the state, due to their refusal to pledge not to discriminate in hiring based on religion," Insider Louisville (December 10, 2014) reports.

Governor Beshear defends the NGSS

Kentucky's governor Steve Beshear (D) recently told WKU Public Radio (October 31, 2013) why he is supporting the state's adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards. "My job, Commissioner Holliday's job, and the Kentucky Board of Education's job is to make sure our children are college and career ready when they leave high school," said Beshear.

Update from Kentucky

The Next Generation Science Standards avoided a potential obstacle in Kentucky when the Interim Joint Committee on Education decided not to address the issue of their adoption, according to WFPL radio in Louisville, Kentucky (October 15, 2013).

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