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The Episcopal Church reaffirms evolution education


At its 75th General Convention in June 2006, the Episcopal Church passed a resolution supporting the teaching of evolution in schools.

Brian Alters discusses evolution and education at NIH


On May 10, 2006, Brian Alters delivered a lecture on "Evolution and Education" in the National Institute of Health's Evolution and Medicine lecture series, presented by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, the Office of Science Education, and the National Human Genome Research Institute. His lecture is now available on-line to view in RealPlayer format.

"Intelligent Judging"


Featured in the May 25, 2006, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine is George J. Annas's article "Intelligent Judging -- Evolution in the Classroom and the Courtroom." Annas distinguishes three waves of activity seeking "to banish or marginalize the teaching of evolution" in the public schools: attempts to ban the teaching of evolution, attempts to teach "creation science" alongside evolution, and attempts to teach "intelligent design" alongside evolution.

"Evolution's bottom line"


In his op-ed "Evolution's bottom line," published in The New York Times (May 12, 2006), Holden Thorp emphasizes the practical applications of evolution, writing, "creationism has no commercial application. Evolution does," and citing several specific examples.

National Council of Churches statement on teaching evolution


The National Council of Churches Committee on Public Education and Literacy recently issued a statement (PDF) on "Science, Religion, and the Teaching of Evolution in Public School Classes," intended "to assist people of faith who experience no conflict between science and religion and who embrace science as one way of appreciating the beauty and complexity of God's creation" as they consider the issues surrounding the teaching of evolution. The statement addresses four questions: "What is science?

Biogeographers add their voice for evolution


The Biogeography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers adopted a strong statement on the teaching of evolution on November 1, 2005.

Canadian entomologists add their voice for evolution


The Entomological Society of Canada adopted a strong resolution on evolution education at its 2005 annual meeting. The resolution reads:

Whereas, entomological science is firmly based on the theory of evolution by natural selection, which is the robust, well-proven and congruent foundation of biological science, and

Virus and the Whale


A new publication from the National Science Teachers Association is designed to help teachers to explore evolutionary concepts with students by taking them on a journey with real scientists. Virus and the Whale: Exploring Evolution in Creatures Small and Large introduces students to some of today's most exciting and up-to-date evolutionary research through the stories of scientists who study evolution -- from the arms race between viruses and their human hosts to the long-term evolutionary changes leading to the emergence of whales.

Henry Morris dies


Henry Morris, the founder of the "creation science" movement, died on February 25, 2006, in Santee, California, at the age of 87. Speaking to The New York Times (March 4, 2006), NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott described him as "the most important creationist of the 20th century, much more so than William Jennings Bryan." And the historian Edward J.

Entomologists add their voice for evolution


The Entomological Society of America passed a strong resolution on evolution education at its 2005 annual meeting, according to the January 2006 edition of the ESA Newsletter (PDF, p. 4).

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