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Antiscience bills die in Florida

House Bill 899 and Senate Bill 1018 both died in committee on March 11, 2016, when the Florida legislature adjourned. Ostensibly aimed at empowering taxpayers to object to the use of specific instructional materials in the public schools, the bills were promoted by groups with a record of objecting to the treatment of evolution and climate change in textbooks, as NCSE previously reported.

Antiscience bills in Florida

Two bills introduced in the Florida legislature — House Bill 899 and Senate Bill 1018 — are ostensibly aimed at empowering taxpayers to object to the use of specific instructional materials in the public schools, for example on the grounds that they fail to provide "a noninflammatory, objective, and balanced viewpoint on issues." There is reason to believe that evolution and climate change are among the targets.

Florida antievolution bill dies

When the Florida legislature adjourned sine die on May 7, 2011, Senate Bill 1854 died in committee. If enacted, SB 1854 would have amended a section of Florida law to require "[a] thorough presentation and critical analysis of the scientific theory of evolution" in the state's public schools.

Opposition to Florida antievolution bill continues

Florida Today took a strong editorial stand against Florida's Senate Bill 1854, which would, if enacted, amend a section of Florida law to require "[a] thorough presentation and critical analysis of the scientific theory of evolution" in the state's public schools.

Reactions to the antievolution bill in Florida

Florida organizations concerned about the integrity of science education are expressing their opposition to Senate Bill 1854, which would, if enacted, amend a section of Florida law to require "[a] thorough presentation and critical analysis of the scientific theory of evolution" in the state's public schools.

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