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Science standards adopted in West Virginia

The West Virginia state board of education adopted a new set of state science standards largely based on the Next Generation Science Standards on April 9, 2015 — "but," the Charleston Gazette (April 9, 2015) explains, "not without adding in changes suggested by board member Wade Linger to the teaching of global warming."

Climate Education Week Approaches

Earth Day poster

April 18-25, 2015, is the inaugural Climate Education Week, sponsored by Earth Day Network. To celebrate, the Climate Education Week website is providing K-12 educators with the Climate Education Toolkit — "a free, easy-to-use, ready-to-go resource with everything you need. The Toolkit includes a week's worth of lesson plans, activities, and contests for K-12 students that meet Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core. Each day covers a different theme related to climate change with two highlighted activities handpicked by Earth Day Network for your use." There are videos, contests, a downloadable Earth Day poster, and even an interactive on-line textbook for middle school students — all aimed at helping to promote climate education!

Public support for climate change education in West Virginia

"The vast majority of official comments on new statewide K-12 science standards — the first to require teaching about global warming in mandatory courses — were in favor of them, according to the West Virginia Department of Education," reports the Charleston Gazette (April 6, 2015). With the comments in hand, the West Virginia state board of education is expected to have its final vote on the standards at its April 8, 2015, meeting.

AFT adds its voice for climate change education

The American Federation of Teachers adopted a resolution in 2014 affirming the role of science in climate change courses.

What's new with Wyoming's science standards?

The Wyoming state board of education voted on March 17, 2015, to return to the task of adopting new science standards, according to Wyoming Public Media (March 17, 2015) — but a proposal to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards outright was rejected.

Opposition to new science standards continues in South Dakota

"The debate over choosing standards for science education in South Dakota's public schools has become a divisive battleground with a clear split between science professionals who strongly support the new standards and opposing parents who disbelieve climate change and evolution," reports the Rapid City Journal (March 17, 2015).

Anti-NGSS bill in Iowa dies

House File 272, which would have prevented Iowa from adopting the Next Generation Science Standards, died on March 6, 2015, when a deadline for House bills to be reported out of committee passed.

 

NGSS unblocked in Wyoming

Governor Matt Mead signed House Bill 23 into law on March 2, 2015, according to the Associated Press (March 2, 2015), so Wyoming is now free to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards.

Anti-NGSS bill in Iowa

House File 272, introduced in the Iowa House of Representatives on February 17, 2015, and referred to the House Committee on Education, would, if enacted, prevent Iowa from adopting the Next Generation Science Standards — and part of the stated reason is the NGSS's treatment of evolution and climate change.

Bill to unblock NGSS passes Wyoming legislature

The Wyoming House of Representatives and Senate have agreed on the wording of a bill that will allow the state board of education to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards, according to Wyoming Public Media (February 26, 2015).

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