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Continued uncertainty in Wyoming

At its April 11, 2014, meeting, the Wyoming state board of education decided not to implement the Next Generation Science Standards, instead turning to a state department of education committee for further guidance. As NCSE previously reported, a footnote in Wyoming's budget for 2014-2016 precludes the use of state funds "for any review or adoption" of the Next Generation Science Standards, and one of its authors acknowledged that the NGSS's treatment of climate change is a reason for the prohibition. 

Climate in a new Harris poll

A new Harris poll finds that nearly half of Americans believe that global climate change is occurring and that human activity is responsible for it. 

Two down in Oklahoma

Oklahoma's House Bill 1674 (PDF), which would, if enacted, have deprived administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies," died in the Senate Education Committee on April 3, 2014, when a deadline for House bills to be passed by their Senate committees expired.

Reaction to Wyoming's blocking the NGSS

The Casper Star-Tribune (March 20, 2014) editorially decried the state legislature's decision to block the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards as "misguided and irresponsible."

Wyoming blocks NGSS over climate

A footnote in Wyoming's budget for 2014-2016 precludes the use of state funds "for any review or adoption" of the Next Generation Science Standards, and one of its authors acknowledges that the NGSS's treatment of climate change is a reason for the prohibition.

Antiscience bill passes the Oklahoma House

Oklahoma's House Bill 1674 (PDF), which would, if enacted, deprive administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies," passed the Oklahoma House of Representatives on a 79-6 vote on March 3, 2014. 

One down in Oklahoma

Oklahoma's Senate Bill 1765 (PDF), which would, if enacted, have deprived administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies," died in the Senate Education Committee on February 24, 2014, when a deadline for senate bills to pass committee expired.

A second antiscience bill in Oklahoma

A bill in Oklahoma that would, if enacted, deprive administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies" is back from the dead.

Continued progress in South Carolina?

At its January 8, 2014, meeting, the South Carolina state board of education voted to adopt a new set of science standards, rejecting two different proposals that would have compromised the treatment of evolution in the process.

A final victory in Texas

"[A] special expert panel has given unanimous approval to the Pearson biology textbook whose adoption by the Texas State Board of Education ... last month had been tripped up by allegations that it contained 'factual errors,'" reports the Texas Freedom Network on its TFN Insider blog (December 17, 2013). 

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