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Kansas science teachers decry antievolution standards


The Kansas Association of Teachers of Science issued a response to the state science standards adopted in November 2005 by the state board of education, the Lawrence Journal-World (February 14, 2006) reported. "By redefining science in the Kansas Science Education Standards," the statement reads in part, "the KBOE is promoting intelligent design tenets that purport supernatural explanations as valid scientific theories. ...

A fourth antievolution bill in Oklahoma


House Concurrent Resolution 1043 (RTF), introduced in the Oklahoma legislature on February 7, 2006, would, if enacted, encourage "the State Board of Education and local boards of education to revise the recommended academic curriculum content standards in science to ensure that, upon graduation, all students can accomplish the following: 1. Use of [sic] the scientific method to critically evaluate scientific theories including, but not limited to, the theory of evolution; and 2.

Ohio's antievolution lesson plan removed


According to early reports [Link broken], the Ohio Board of Education voted 11-4 at its February 14, 2006, meeting to remove both the "Critical Analysis of Evolution" model lesson plan and the corresponding indicator in the state standards. The board's vote follows in the wake of a motion to remove the lesson plan during the board's January meeting, which failed 9-8.

Ohio's antievolution lesson plan under challenge


Although a proposal to remove the controversial "Critical Analysis of Evolution" lesson plan from the Ohio model science curriculum was narrowly defeated at the January meeting of the Ohio state board of education, the proposal is likely to be renewed at the board's February meeting, thanks to both a thinly disguised reproach from Ohio Governor Bob Taft (R) and a stinging rebuke from a large majority of the committee that originally helped to develop the standards.

Creationist interference at NASA?


Creationism emerged as a subsidiary theme as allegations of political interference with climate science at NASA were in the news. In a story in The New York Times (January 29, 2006), Andrew Revkin described climate scientist James E.

Anticreationism legislation in Wisconsin


At a press conference in Madison, Wisconsin, on February 7, 2006, state representative Terese Berceau (D-District 76) announced her intention to introduce legislation in the state assembly which would, if enacted, prohibit the teaching of supernaturalistic pseudoscience in the science classrooms of the state's public schools.

"Intelligent design" belittles God, says Vatican astronomer


The director of the Vatican Observatory, Father George V. Coyne S.J., delivered a talk in which he argued that "the Intelligent Design (ID) movement, while evoking a God of power and might, a designer God, actually belittles God" on January 31, 2006. His talk, entitled "Science Does Not Need God. Or Does It? A Catholic Scientist Looks at Evolution," was presented as the annual Aquinas Lecture at Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, Florida.

A second antievolution bill in Michigan


House Bill 5606 was introduced in the Michigan House of Representatives on January 24, 2006, and referred to the Committee on Education, chaired by the bill's primary sponsor, Brian Palmer (R-District 36).

Utah's SB 96 approved by Senate


Utah's Senate Bill 96, sponsored by Senator Chris Buttars (R-District 10), was passed by the Senate on January 23, 2006, by a 16-12 vote.

A third antievolution bill in Oklahoma


Senate Bill 1959 (RTF), introduced by Senator Daisy Lawler (D-District 24), is the third antievolution bill to be introduced in the Oklahoma legislature in 2006. If enacted, SB 1959 would provide:

A. Every teacher in a public school in this state shall be authorized to present information and allow classroom discussions that provide for views that may pertain to the full range of scientific views in any science course.

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