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Antiscience bill in South Dakota dies

South Dakota's Senate Bill 83 is out of commission, following a February 4, 2016, hearing in the Senate Education Committee. The committee voted 4-3 to defer further consideration of the bill to the forty-first legislative day, and since the legislative session in South Dakota is thirty-eight days long in 2016, the bill is effectively dead.

Update from South Dakota

South Dakota's Senate Bill 83 — which would, if enacted, allow teachers to teach "the strengths and weaknesses of scientific information" presented in courses aligned with the state education standards — received coverage from the Sioux Falls Argus Leader (January 31, 2016).

Antiscience bill in South Dakota

Senate Bill 83, introduced in the South Dakota Senate and referred to the Senate Education Committee on January 25, 2016, would, if enacted, allow teachers to teach "the strengths and weaknesses of scientific information" presented in courses aligned with the state education standards.

Anti-NGSS bill in Iowa

House File 2054, introduced in the Iowa House of Representatives on January 19, 2016, and referred to the House Committee on Education, would, if enacted, reverse Iowa's decision to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards — and there is reason to believe that part of the motivation is the NGSS's treatment of evolution and climate change.

A second antiscience bill in Oklahoma

House Bill 3045 (PDF), styled the Scientific Education and Academic Freedom Act, is the second antiscience bill in the Oklahoma legislature for 2016, joining Senate Bill 1322.

Antievolution legislation in Oklahoma

Senate Bill 1322 (PDF), styled the Oklahoma Science Education Act, is the latest antievolution bill in the Sooner State.

Vacation creationism bill introduced in Kentucky

A bill introduced in the Kentucky legislature would extend the duration of summer vacation in order to boost tourism — including to a creationist attraction. 

Antiscience bills in Florida

Two bills introduced in the Florida legislature — House Bill 899 and Senate Bill 1018 — are ostensibly aimed at empowering taxpayers to object to the use of specific instructional materials in the public schools, for example on the grounds that they fail to provide "a noninflammatory, objective, and balanced viewpoint on issues." There is reason to believe that evolution and climate change are among the targets.

"Creationism Whistleblower"

Zack KopplinZack Kopplin

Writing in The Daily Beast (December 28, 2015), Zack Kopplin reviews the last decade of antievolution strategies — with the assistance of a former employee of the Discovery Institute, the de facto institutional home of "intelligent design" creationism.

Matzke's Kitzmas tree in the news

Nick Matzke outside the Rhea County, Tennessee, courthouse, where John T. Scopes was tried in 1925.Nick Matzke outside the Rhea County, Tennessee, courthouse, where John T. Scopes was tried in 1925

Nick Matzke's "The Evolution of Antievolution Policies after Kitzmiller v. Dover" (PDF; subscription required), a new paper forthcoming in Science, is receiving plenty of press coverage. As NCSE previously reported, the paper shows that even though creationism is getting stealthier in the wake of legal defeats such as Kitzmiller v. Dover, techniques from modern evolutionary biology reveal how creationist legislation is evolving.

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