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Montana's antiscience bill in the news

"A Billings legislator has reintroduced a bill that would encourage high school teachers to present evolutionary biology as disputed theory rather than sound science and protect those who teach viewpoints like creationism in the classroom," reports the Billings Gazette (January 29, 2015).

Progress in Scotland

Flag-map of Scotland via Wikimedia Commons

The petition to ask the Scottish government to ban the teaching of creationism in the public schools was revived when, at its January 27, 2015, meeting, the Public Petitions Committee of the Scottish parliament decided to forward the petition to the Education and Culture Committee for further action.

Dueling legislation in Scotland

Flag-map of Scotland via Wikimedia Commons

As a result of a controversy over creationist encroachments in the public schools in South Lanarkshire, Scotland, and a petition to the Scottish parliament to ban the teaching of creationism as scientifically credible, there are now dueling motions about creationism in the Scottish parliament.

Antiscience legislation in South Dakota

South Dakota's Senate Bill 114 is the fourth antiscience bill of 2015, following on the heels of Missouri's House Bill 486, Indiana's Senate Bill 562, and Oklahoma's Senate Bill 665.

Antievolution bill imminent in Montana

A Montana legislator, Clayton Fiscus (R-District 46), is preparing to introduce a bill purporting to "emphasize critical thinking in instruction related to controversial scientific theories on the origin of life" such as "biological evolution, the chemical origins of life, random mutation, natural selection, DNA, and fossil discoveries." 

Antievolution legislation in Oklahoma

Senate Bill 665 (document), styled the Oklahoma Science Education Act, is the third antiscience bill of the year.

Indiana's antiscience bill in the news

"Call it a back-door approach to failed attempts to chip away at state standards on teaching evolution and to bring creationism into the public school classroom," wrote the Lafayette, Indiana, Journal and Courier (January 20, 2015), referring to Senate Bill 562, which if enacted would deprive administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies."

Antiscience legislation in Indiana

Indiana's Senate Bill 562, introduced and referred to the Senate Committee on Education & Career Development on January 20, 2015, is the second antiscience bill of the year, following Missouri's House Bill 486.

Antievolution legislation in Missouri

Missouri's House Bill 486 (PDF), introduced in the Missouri House of Representatives on January 13, 2015, would confer "academic freedom to teach scientific evidence regarding evolution" to teachers. If enacted, the bill would in effect encourage science teachers with idiosyncratic opinions to teach anything they pleased, and discourage responsible educational authorities from intervening. The bill specifically cites "the theory of biological and hypotheses of chemical evolution" as controversial.

Appeal in COPE v. Kansas

The dismissal of a creationist lawsuit seeking to prevent Kansas from adopting the Next Generation Science Standards on the grounds that doing so would "establish and endorse a non-theistic religious worldview" is now under appeal. The Associated Press (December 31, 2014) reports that the plaintiffs in COPE et al. v. Kansas State Board of Education et al. filed a notice of appeal with the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit on December 30, 2014. 

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