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Antievolution legislation in Alabama

Alabama

House Bill 923, introduced in the Alabama House of Representatives by David Grimes (R-District 73) on April 24, 2008, and referred to the Education Policy Committee, is the latest in a string of "academic freedom" bills aimed at undermining the teaching of evolution.

Alabama antievolution bills die


When the Alabama legislature adjourned on April 18, 2006, House Bill 106 and Senate Bill 45 died.

Two antievolution bills in Alabama


On January 10, 2006, two identical bills -- House Bill 106 and Senate Bill 45 -- were introduced in the Alabama legislature, under the rubric of "The Academic Freedom Act," and referred to the Committees on Education of their respective chambers.

Three antievolution bills die in Alabama

May 3, 2005, was the final day for proposed legislation to pass in either the House or the Senate and still have a chance of passing in the other chamber of the Alabama legislature. Among the dozens of bills that died were HB 352, HB 716 and SB 240.

Evolution in Alabama

On February 10, 2005, the Alabama State Board of Education adopted a revised set of state science standards [Link expired] (the Alabama Course of Study: Science, or ACOSS).

"Alternative Theories" Legislation — Again

On February 8, 2005, a pair of bills — House Bill 352 and Senate Bill 240 — was introduced in the Alabama legislature, under the rubric of "The Academic Freedom Act." Virtually identical, these bills purport to protect the right of teachers "to present scientific critiques of prevailing scientific theories" and the right of students to "hold positions regarding scientific views." In language reminiscent of the Santorum language removed from the No Child Left Behind Act, they specify that "[t]he rights and privileges contained in this act apply when topics are taught that may generate co

Alabama legislature lets SB336 die without a vote


by Nick Matzke

On May 17, the final day of the 2004 legislative session, the Alabama state House adjourned without voting on SB336, a bill that would have allowed Alabama's teachers to present "alternative theories" of "biological or physical origins." Although SB336 was on the agenda for the final day, negotiations on the annual budget lasted into the evening, and the legislature adjourned at 10 p.m. without considering several controversial bills.

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