NCSE News / Anti-Evolution Actions Alert

10.15.2004
Evolution is a problem for some of the members of the Charles County, Maryland, Board of Education, to judge from a recently released list of goals and suggestions compiled by its members. Among the entries were recommendations not to use 10th-grade biology textbooks "biased toward evolution" and to provide creationist books and videos to students.
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09.29.2004
The cover story in the October 2004 issue of Wired magazine is Evan Ratliff's "The Crusade Against Evolution," with the tag line: "In the beginning there was Darwin. And then there was intelligent design. How the next generation of 'creation science' is invading America's classrooms."
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09.09.2004

by Nick Matzke

In the space of a few days, evolution in Serbian biology classes was removed and reinstated.

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09.03.2004

The controversy about the publication of "intelligent design" advocate Stephen C. Meyer's article "The origin of biological information and the higher taxonomic categories" in the Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington is now attracting attention in the press.
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08.04.2004
With the results of the August 3, 2004, primary election, the balance of power on the Kansas Board of Education is likely to tilt in favor of anti-evolutionists, for the first time since 1999, when the board voted to de-emphasize evolution in the state's science standards. The board is presently split 5-5 between supporters and opponents of evolution education.
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07.06.2004
On July 5, 2004, the school board in Darby, Montana voted 3-2 not to adopt a proposed "objective origins policy" on its second reading. The policy had been tentatively approved on February 2 at its first reading, but is now rejected. The proposal sparked intense local controversy and national media attention earlier this year. The fate of the policy became the central issue in the May school board election, where two policy supporters were decisively defeated by opponents, resulting in the change in board majority from "pro" to "anti".
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06.02.2004
On its last working day, the Minnesota legislature adopted new science standards for the state. In one of their last acts before adjourning on May 16, both houses voted for the standards as forwarded to them by the Department of Education in December, 2003. They thus approved the standards as written and submitted by a committee of educators and citizens.
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05.27.2004
When the Minnesota legislature adjourned on May 16 two bills based on the "Santorum amendment" to the federal No Child Left Behind education act finally died. House File 2003 and Senate File 1714 were companion bills, identical in language, introduced early in the year. Each was referred to the appropriate education committee, but neither made any further progress through the legislature during the remainder of the 2004 session.
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