You are here

"Intelligent design" at NMNH?


On May 28, 2005, readers of The New York Times were surprised to discover that The Privileged Planet -- a film based on the book of the same title by Guillermo Gonzalez and Jay Wesley Richards, both affiliated with the Discovery Institute -- was scheduled for a private showing at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC.

Monkey see, monkey do?


The evolution/creationism controversy was featured on the May 27, 2005, installment of The Journal Editorial Report, a news and discussion program featuring members of The Wall Street Journal's editorial staff that airs weekly on PBS stations across the country.

Orr on "intelligent design" in The New Yorker


H. Allen Orr of the University of Rochester again takes on "intelligent design" in his essay "Devolution: Why intelligent design isn't," published in the May 30, 2005, issue of The New Yorker.

Kudos for Selman and Manely


Jeffrey Selman, the lead plaintiff in Selman et al. v. Cobb County School District et al., and Michael Manely, the Marietta, Georgia, lawyer who was the lead attorney for the plaintiffs in the case, received the Mary Beth Tinker Award in Washington, D.C., on May 18, 2005.

Antievolution bill dies in Missouri


When the legislative session of the Missouri House of Representatives ended on May 13, 2005, House Bill 35 died in the Education Committee. HB 35 provided that:

All biology textbooks sold to the public schools of the state of Missouri shall have one or more chapters containing a critical analysis of origins.

All over but the shouting in Kansas


The Kansas Board of Education hearings on proposed revisions to the state science standards, which were widely condemned as a kangaroo court or show trial, commenced on May 5, 2005 in Topeka, Kansas.

Equal time for "intelligent design" legislation in New York


Assembly Bill 8036, introduced on May 3, 2005, and referred to the Committee on Education, would require that "all pupils in grades kindergarten through twelve in all public schools in the state ... receive instruction in both theories of intelligent design and evolution." It also charges New York's commissioner of education to assist in developing curricula and local boards of education to provide "appropriate training and curriculum materials ...

Controversial Florida legislation dies


When the legislative session of the Florida House of Representatives ended on May 6, 2005, House Bill 837 -- a version of the so-called Academic Bill of Rights promoted by conservative activist David Horowitz -- died.

Stickers must go, says federal court


When Judge Clarence Cooper ruled that the evolution disclaimers in the Cobb County School District's textbooks were unconstitutional, he also ordered the stickers to be removed. Because of the time needed, he subsequently allowed the removal to be scheduled for the summer of 2005. Nevertheless, the Cobb County School District asked the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to stay the order, pending its decision on the district's appeal of Selman. On May 3, 2005, a three-judge panel denied the Cobb County School District's request.

East Porter approves biology textbook


On April 25, 2005, the board of the East Porter County (Indiana) School Corporation voted 6-1 to adopt science textbooks recommended by a district committee. Several board members had previously raised questions about the proposed biology texts because they contained material about evolution, but not about creationism or other "alternative theories," and a decision on the textbooks was delayed to allow board members time to inspect the proposed texts.

Pages