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A groundswell of support in Texas

When the Texas state board of education held its final public hearing on science textbook adoption on November 20, 2013, NCSE's Joshua Rosenau was on hand to present the board with a statement urging the adoption of the textbooks endorsed by no fewer than fifty-one scientific and educational societies.

A final defeat for Freshwater

In a 4-3 decision issued on November 19, 2013, the Supreme Court of Ohio upheld the termination of John Freshwater.

Creationism's last stand in Texas?

As the Texas state board of education is preparing for its final public hearing on science textbook adoption, the Dallas Observer (November 14, 2013) published a marvelously detailed look at Texas antievolutionism past and present.

NSTA's advice to Texas

The executive director of the National Science Teachers Association called on the Texas state board of education to "reject any pressure to promote any nonscientific views in its textbooks or classrooms."

Governor Beshear defends the NGSS

Kentucky's governor Steve Beshear (D) recently told WKU Public Radio (October 31, 2013) why he is supporting the state's adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards. "My job, Commissioner Holliday's job, and the Kentucky Board of Education's job is to make sure our children are college and career ready when they leave high school," said Beshear.

Publishers hold the line in Texas

"Materials submitted to the Texas Education Agency and examined by the Texas Freedom Network and university scientists show that publishers are resisting pressure to undermine instruction on evolution in their proposed new high school biology textbooks for public schools," according to a press release issued by the Texas Freedom Network on October 16, 2013.

Update from Kentucky

The Next Generation Science Standards avoided a potential obstacle in Kentucky when the Interim Joint Committee on Education decided not to address the issue of their adoption, according to WFPL radio in Louisville, Kentucky (October 15, 2013).

"Why can't science teachers simply teach science?"

"Why can't science teachers simply teach science?" was the reaction of a columnist for the Charleston, South Carolina, Post and Courier (October 13, 2013), in the wake of the state board of education's discussion of the revised state science standards at its October 9, 2013, meeting.

Progress in South Carolina?

"The state Board of Education gave initial approval to a new set of science standards Wednesday, although some board members tried to overturn the vote out of concern over whether the new guidelines leave room for students' religious beliefs on the origin of life," reported the Greenville News (October 9, 2013).

Update from Texas

The creationists and climate change deniers reviewing biology textbooks in Texas attracted the attention of the newspaper of record. "As Texas gears up to select biology textbooks for use by high school students over the next decade, the panel responsible for reviewing submissions from publishers has stirred controversy because a number of its members do not accept evolution and climate change," The New York Times (September 28, 2013) reported.

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