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Encouraging news from South Korea

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The plan to eliminate examples of evolution from textbooks in South Korea is under reconsideration.

Freshwater appeal to be heard

The Ohio Supreme Court will hear the appeal of John Freshwater, the middle school science teacher in Mount Vernon, Ohio, who was fired over his inappropriate religious activity in the classroom, including teaching creationism.

"An Evolving Controversy"

Will a new generation of science standards improve the teaching of science?

NCSE's Newton on creationism and climate change denial

"What do creationists and climate change deniers have in common?" asks NCSE's Steven Newton, writing in the May 2012 issue of the American Geoscience Institute's magazine, Earth.

Cringing in Kansas

The renewed complaints of a few members of the Kansas state board of education about evolution is making Kansans cringe, according to the editorial board of the Lawrence Journal-World (June 15, 2012).

Update from Kansas

As expected, when the Kansas state board of education heard a presentation about the current status of the Next Generation Science Standards on June 12, 2012, evolution was in the crosshairs.

Trouble on the Kansas horizon?

"Kansas is headed toward another debate over how evolution is taught in its public schools," the Associated Press (June 6, 2012) reports, "with a State Board of Education member saying Wednesday that science standards under development are 'very problematic' for describing the theory as a well-established, core scientific concept."

Creationist success in South Korea?

A creationist campaign to remove references to evolution from high school biology textbooks in South Korea succeeded in May 2012, according to a report in Nature (June 5, 2012), when "the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology revealed that many of the publishers would produce revised editions that exclude examples of the evolution of the horse or of avian ancestor Archaeopteryx."

"Classroom Clashes"

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"Clashroom Clashes" — a two-part series by Carrie Madren posted on the American Association for the Advancement of Science's STEM.edu blog — "talks with middle and high school teachers across the country to find out what it's like to be on the frontlines of two often-controversial science topics — evolution and climate change — and how they deal with the pushback."

Oklahoma okay at last

When the Oklahoma legislature adjourned sine die on May 25, 2012, no fewer than three legislative attempts to attack the teaching of evolution and of climate change were finally laid to rest.

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