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"Climate science is core to science education"

American Meteorological Society

The American Meteorological Society, in a policy statement adopted on May 23, 2013, affirmed the importance of climate science to science education. The AMS criticized attempts to undermine the teaching of climate change "by those seeking to frame it as somehow different from other scientific subjects, often with claims that it is either 'uncertain' or 'controversial.' They advocate the need for a special approach to its teaching, such as added effort to balance perspectives." "With this statement, the AMS seeks to confirm the solid scientific foundation on which climate change science rests, and to emphasize that teaching approaches different from other sciences are not warranted. Uncertainty is a natural component of all scientific endeavor. The existence of uncertainty does not undermine the scientific validity of climate change science; to the contrary, it provides a sound example for broader instruction of the scientific method."

The statement continues by reviewing the scientific basis of climate science ("The primary findings of climate change science have been well established in the peer-reviewed science literature and replicated by numerous independent investigators and methodologies. ... There are small scientific differences as research continues to refine the details, but there is strong agreement on the primary findings and essentially no controversy with respect to them.") and debunking the idea that it is inherently dubious ("Scientists acknowledge and work routinely within a framework of uncertainty. ... Aspects of climate science such as the greenhouse effect, the flows of solar and terrestrial radiation, and feedbacks are as scientifically sound as gravity, the human genome, or orbital mechanics.") "Climate literacy in the next generation of U.S. citizens," the AMS concluded, "will ensure a firm foundation of knowledge and discourse as society faces decisions on how to best deal with a changing climate."