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News. Latest headlines regarding the fight for science education.

Encouraging news from Turkey?

When the Justice and Development Party (AKP) lost its parliamentary majority in the June 7, 2015, election, scientists in Turkey were "euphoric," according to Nature (June 16, 2015), hoping that the next parliament will "reverse the creeping restrictions on academic freedom and the seeping away of scientific standards that have been a feature of the AKP's 12 years of political domination" — including the party's support for creationism.

A chance to help NCSE's archives!

NCSE's archives house a unique trove of material on the creationism/evolution controversy, and we regard it as part of our mission to preserve it for posterity — as well as for occasions such as Kitzmiller v. Dover, where NCSE's archives helped to establish the creationist antecedents of the "intelligent design" movement. And we are beginning to amass a similar trove of material on disputes over climate change education.

Kansas answers COPE again

"Kansas education officials deny standards they adopted for teaching of science in public schools endorse what critics say is ... 'a non-theistic religious Worldview,'" reports the Topeka Capital-Journal (June 8, 2015), discussing a brief submitted by the defendants-appellees in COPE et al. v. Kansas State Board of Education et al. 

Antiscience bill dies in Alabama

Alabama's House Bill 592 (PDF) died in committee in the Alabama House of Representatives on June 4, 2015, when the legislative session ended. The bill would have encouraged teachers and students to "debate the strengths and weaknesses of the theory of evolution in public schools across Alabama," reported the Anniston Star (May 7, 2015).

Creationism revealed in Louisiana schools, continued

"We will read in Genesis and them [sic] some supplemental material debunking various aspects of evolution from which the student will present." So wrote a Louisiana science teacher to her principal, as quoted by Zack Kopplin, writing in Slate (June 2, 2015).

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