You are here

News. Latest headlines regarding the fight for science education.

Reid and Branch on confronting creationism

Bill Nye visits NCSE

With the recent debate between Bill Nye "The Science Guy" and Ken Ham of Answers in Genesis attracting as many as three million viewers, it is likely that interest in creationism/evolution debates will skyrocket. Writing in The Scientist (February 7, 2014), NCSE's Ann Reid and Glenn Branch warn that "formal oral debates between scientists and creationists are by and large counterproductive — at least if the goal is to improve the public's understanding of evolution and the nature of science, and to increase the level of support for the teaching of evolution uncompromised by religious dogma."

South Dakota "intelligent design" bill killed

South Dakota's Senate Bill 112, which would, if enacted, provide that "[n]o school board or school administrator may prohibit a teacher in public or nonpublic school from providing instruction on intelligent design or other related topics," was killed in the Senate Education Committee on February 6, 2014, according to the Rapid City Journal (February 6, 2014).

Continuing concern in South Dakota

"A South Dakota lawmaker wants public school teachers to be free to teach intelligent design in their classrooms even though courts have ruled intelligent design is inherently religious — and therefore unconstitutional in school," according to a report from KMEG 14, headquartered in Sioux City, Iowa, just across the Missouri river from South Dakota.

Mixed news from Virginia

Virginia's House Bill 207, which would deprive administrators of the ability to prevent teachers from miseducating students about "scientific controversies," is in search of a home.

"Intelligent design" bill deemed "odd"

South Dakota's Senate Bill 112 was deemed the "odd bill of the week" by the Rapid City Journal (February 2, 2014).

Pages