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Answers in Genesis in legal turmoil


In the wake of the opening of its creation "museum" in northern Kentucky, Answers in Genesis is in the news again, due to a lawsuit filed against the young-earth creationist ministry in the Supreme Court of Queensland, Australia, by a rival ministry. The lawsuit is ultimately due to the acrimonious schism of AiG in 2005, due to differences between the Australian branch, headed by Carl Wieland, and the United States branch, headed by Ken Ham, over the structure and management of the organization.

Tennessee creationist measure is dead for now


WMC-TV in Memphis reports [Link broken] (June 16, 2007) that Senate Resolution 17 failed to pass during the first session of the 105th General Assembly of the state of Tennessee. Introduced by Senator Raymond Finney (R-District 8) on February 21, 2007, the resolution, if enacted, would request the commissioner of education to justify the fact that creationism is not taught in the state's public schools.

Behe's latest scrutinized


The new book from "intelligent design" proponent Michael Behe, The Edge of Evolution (Free Press, 2007), is supposed to present "astounding new findings from the genetics revolution to show that Darwinism cannot account for the sheer complexity and near-miraculous design of life as we know it," according to a press release from the publisher.

"Understanding the intelligent design creationist movement"


The Center for Inquiry released a new position paper, "Understanding the intelligent design creationist movement: Its true nature and goals," on May 29, 2007.

Tallahassee Scientific Society adds its voice for evolution


On June 4, 2007, the Tallahassee Scientific Society adopted a resolution (RTF) [Link broken] on the teaching of "intelligent design" as science, in response to the recently initiated review of Florida's state science standards.

Summer reading in Natural History


Writing in the June 2007 issue of Natural History, Richard Milner reviews a batch of books centering on the Kitzmiller v. Dover trial, explaining, "Kitzmiller v.

"In the Beginning" redux


For those who missed the BBC World Service's two-part program on creationism featuring NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott and Henry M. Morris III of the Institute of Creation Research, it is now available on the Templeton-Cambridge Journalism Fellowships in Science & Religion website.

And now a word about the creation "museum"


The young-earth creationist ministry Answers in Genesis opened the doors of its lavish creation museum in northern Kentucky during the Memorial Day weekend. Here is a sampling of memorable quotes from the press coverage:

"Taking the Bible seriously doesn't mean you have to take it literally or reject evolution." -- Mendle Adams, pastor of St.

Reactions to creation "museum"


With the young-earth creationist ministry Answers in Genesis scheduled to open its lavish creation museum in northern Kentucky over the Memorial Day weekend, there is a great deal of concern among the scientific and educational communities in the adjacent states about its impact on the public understanding of evolution. NCSE executive director Eugenie C. Scott told ABC's Good Morning America (May 25, 2007) that her fear is that students will "show up in classrooms and say, 'Gee, Mrs.

Stanley Miller dies


Stanley Miller, a pioneer in scientific research on the origin of life, died on May 20, 2007, at the age of 77, in National City, California. Born in Oakland, California, in 1930, Miller received his bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1951, and his doctorate from the University of Chicago in 1954. As a graduate student at Chicago under the supervision of Harold C.

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