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Answers in Genesis in legal turmoil


In the wake of the opening of its creation "museum" in northern Kentucky, Answers in Genesis is in the news again, due to a lawsuit filed against the young-earth creationist ministry in the Supreme Court of Queensland, Australia, by a rival ministry. The lawsuit is ultimately due to the acrimonious schism of AiG in 2005, due to differences between the Australian branch, headed by Carl Wieland, and the United States branch, headed by Ken Ham, over the structure and management of the organization.

In the schism, the AiG branches in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa became Creation Ministries International, and the AiG branches in the United States and the United Kingdom continued as Answers in Genesis. CMI is now suing AiG over a number of issues arising from the schism, particularly control of Creation magazine; CMI alleges that the Kentucky group in effect stole subscribers for its new Answers magazine by ceasing to distribute Creation and claiming that it was "no longer available."

The story broke in the mainstream media with a report about the lawsuit in The Australian (June 5, 2007), followed by a similar report [Link broken] in the Lexington Herald-Leader (June 17, 2007), one of the major newspapers in the vicinity of AiG's Kentucky headquarters. Both articles provide a useful introduction to the complicated history, and the tangle of accusations and counteraccusations, surrounding the schism.

For further details and links to relevant documentation, however, consult a useful summary on the Duae Quartunciae blog, as well as the blog of Jim Lippard, a long-time observer of creationist groups who was reporting on the AiG schism from early 2006 and who was a quoted source in the Herald-Leader's article. A piece by Lippard on the schism is to appear in a future issue of Reports of the NCSE; in it, Lippard concludes, "creationism continues to evolve in fascinating ways."