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Teachers Torn Over Religion, Evolution


Writing in the February 2, 2005, issue of Education Week, Sean Cavanagh discusses "Teachers Torn Over Religion, Evolution" (registration required).

Forrest in Church and State


Barbara Forrest was interviewed by Americans United for Separation of Church and State about her book (coauthored with Paul R. Gross) Creationism's Trojan Horse: The Wedge of Intelligent Design (Oxford University Press, 2004). An excerpt from the interview will appear in the February 2005 issue of Church and State, the monthly journal of Americans United, and the complete text appears on the Americans United web site.

Newsweek feature story on evolution, "intelligent design," Steves


The February 7, 2005, issue of Newsweek contains a feature story about recent attempts across the country to insert "intelligent design" into public school science classrooms.

Evolution Takes a Back Seat in U.S. Classes


An important article by Cornelia Dean in the Science section of the February 1, 2005, issue of The New York Times details a common, but rarely recognized, form of evolution censorship in the United States: self-censorship. In her article, "Evolution Takes a Back Seat in U.S.

New antievolution legislation


House Bill 179, introduced in the Georgia House of Representatives on January 27, 2005, would require "Whenever any theory of the origin of human beings or other living things is included in a course of study offered by a local unit of administration, factual scientific evidence supporting or consistent with evolution theory and factual scientific evidence inconsistent with or not supporting the theory shall be included in the course of study." NCSE's executive director Eugenie C.

"Stealth attack on evolution" in Time


Contained in the January 31, 2005, issue of Time magazine is "Stealth attack on evolution," by Michael D. Lemonick, Noah Isackson, and Jeffrey Ressner.

Op-ed columns on the Cobb County disclaimer


A trio of op-ed columns greeted the January 13, 2005, ruling in Selman et al. v. Cobb County School District et al., in which U.S. District Judge Clarence Cooper deemed that the evolution disclaimer required in the Cobb County School District violated the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. Although the board decided (on January 17) to appeal the decision to the 11th U.S. District Court of Appeals, the discussions in these columns are still worthwhile and timely. And a humor column in Scientific American looks on the lighter side.

Editorials endorsing evolution education


Astute analyses of anti-evolutionist tactics appeared in editorials in The New York Times on January 23 and the Washington Post on January 24.

Roland Mushat Frye dies


The eminent scholar Roland Mushat Frye died on January 20, 2005, at the age of 83, in Gladwyne, Pennsylvania. Born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1922, Frye earned three degrees, including his Ph.D., from Princeton University. He served in the United States Army during World War II and was awarded the Bronze Star. After the war, he taught at Emory University and was a research professor in residence at the Folger Shakespeare Library before settling at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was the Felix E. Schelling Professor of English Literature until retiring in 1983.

Cobb County to Appeal Selman Verdict


On January 17, 2005, the Cobb County School Board voted 5-2 to appeal the ruling in Selman et al. v. Cobb County School District et al., which ordered the removal of evolution disclaimers from the school district's textbooks. Announcing the decision, Kathie Johnstone, chair of the board, described Judge Clarence Cooper's ruling as an "unnecessary judicial intrusion into local control of schools."

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