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Project Steve in The New York Times


In her essay "How Quantum Physics Can Teach Biologists About Evolution," published in the July 5, 2005, issue of The New York Times, Cornelia Dean suggests that biologists would do better to defend evolution not by insisting on its truth per se but by explaining the scientific methodology on which it is based. En route, she writes:

And when scientists named Steve (hundreds of them by now) decided to advance the cause of evolution in the classroom and honor the evolutionary theorist Stephen Jay Gould by forming "Project Steve," the T-shirts they printed said in part, "Evolution is a vital, well-supported, unifying principle of the biological sciences, and the scientific evidence is overwhelmingly in favor of the idea that all living things share a common ancestry."
Later, she mentions NCSE's sponsorship of Project Steve and quotes Ohio State University biology professor Steve Rissing (Steve #20) on the supposed "data contradicting evolution" -- if there were any, Rissing quipped, "I sure would want to be the scientist publishing them."

There are presently 575 scientists named Steve who have signed the Project Steve statement:

Evolution is a vital, well-supported, unifying principle of the biological sciences, and the scientific evidence is overwhelmingly in favor of the idea that all living things share a common ancestry. Although there are legitimate debates about the patterns and processes of evolution, there is no serious scientific doubt that evolution occurred or that natural selection is a major mechanism in its occurrence. It is scientifically inappropriate and pedagogically irresponsible for creationist pseudoscience, including but not limited to "intelligent design," to be introduced into the science curricula of our nation's public schools.
Further information, including the complete list of Steves, a listing of previous media attention to Project Steve, and answers to frequently asked questions, are available on the Project Steve section of NCSE's website.