You are here

New videos on NCSE's YouTube channel

Three videos have just been added to NCSE's YouTube channel. First, a Netroots Nation panel on science denial from August 2009, organized by NCSE's Joshua Rosenau and featuring Rosenau, Bryan Rehm, Michael Stebbins, Mark Sumner, and Susan Wood. And two blasts from the past with NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott: talking with Arie Korporaal about "Controversial Issues in Science Teaching" on Los Angeles County's Educational Telecommunications Network in 1991, and appearing on WRC-TV's "Headlines on Trial," hosted by Arthur Miller, in 1987. Tune in and enjoy!

Ayala wins the Templeton Prize

Francisco J. AyalaFrancisco J. Ayala

NCSE congratulates Francisco J. Ayala on winning the Templeton Prize.

Polling the creationism/evolution controversy

NCSE is pleased to announce a new section of its website that provides information on polls and surveys relevant to the creationism/evolution controversy.

Need a speaker?

As the only national organization that is wholly dedicated to defending the teaching of evolution in the public schools, NCSE is the perfect place to find someone to speak to your organization or university about issues relevant to evolution education and attacks on it. Available speakers include NCSE's executive director Eugenie C. Scott, Glenn Branch, Joshua Rosenau, Steven Newton, Peter M. J. Hess, Louise S. Mead, Eric Meikle, and Philip Spieth, as well as three members of our board of directors, Barbara Forrest, Kevin Padian, and Andrew J. Petto. So if you need a speaker, please feel free to visit the speakers information page on the NCSE website or get in touch with the NCSE office. If nobody from NCSE is available or suitable, we'll try to find you someone who is!

A chance to help NCSE's archives!

NCSE's archives house a unique trove of material on the creationism/evolution controversy, and we regard it as part of our mission to preserve it for posterity — as well as for occasions such as Kitzmiller v. Dover, where NCSE's archives helped to establish the creationist antecedents of the "intelligent design" movement.

Catching up with RNCSE

Selected content from volume 29, number 5, of Reports of the National Center for Science Education is now available on NCSE's website.

Announcing the first annual UpChucky award

Not content only to honor those who have valiantly defended the teaching of evolution in the public schools with its annual Friend of Darwin award, NCSE is introducing a new award: the UpChucky, bestowed on the most noisome creationist of the year.

Friends of Darwin awards for three Texans

NCSE is pleased to announce the winners of the Friends of Darwin award for 2010: David Hillis, Gerald Skoog, and Ronald Wetherington, all scientists in Texas who have fought for the integrity of science education in the Lone Star State.

NCSE's Mead and Scott in the blogosphere

NCSE Logo

Two members of NCSE's staff, education project director Louise S. Mead and executive director Eugenie C. Scott, recently surfaced in the blogosphere — Mead with a guest post on the blog of the National Association of Biology Teachers, and Scott in a question-and-answer session on the La Ciencia y sus Demonios (Science and its Demons) blog.

"Five reasons why evolution is important"

Steven NewtonSteven Newton

Writing at the Huffington Post (February 12, 2010), NCSE's Steven Newton offered, in honor of Charles Darwin's 201st birthday, a list of five ways in which evolution is important to medical practice: improving the understanding of H1N1 and emerging diseases, HIV, vaccines, antibiotic resistance, and drug development.

Pages

Subscribe to NCSE