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What Will the Creationists Do Next?

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, PhD

Time: 
2:30pm
Date: 
April 15, 2009
Location: 
Intellectual Commons
Doheny Memorial Library 233
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, California


After the failure of creation science and intelligent design to survive legal tests of their constitutionality, the creationist movement evolved new strategies. These call for teaching the “strengths and weaknesses of evolution” or the “critical analysis of evolution” which are creationism in disguise. In lieu of policies promoting the teaching of creation science or Intelligent Design, modern creationists try to change state science education standards or pass state legislation to promote these “softer” and less-obvious approaches. Such “Academic Freedom Act” legislation has popped up in several states already, and reflects the creationism du jour.

Dr. Scott's talk is part of a larger event: "Darwin Today: Evolution and Scientific Thought", which runs from 10am to 4pm.

A presentation in the
USC Darwin Bicentennial Symposium

For more information: 

Symposium: The Roles and Intersections between Educational Research and the Sciences

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, Francisco Ayala, Michael Reiss, Brian Alters, Father George Coyne, and Jay Labov
Eugenie Scott
Time: 
8:25pm
Date: 
April 14, 2009
Location: 
American Education Research Association, Annual Meeting
San Diego Convention Center
Ballroom 6F
San Diego, CA


This symposium will address how scientists, theologians, and education researchers might collaborate more effectively in the future. Scientists and theologians who have written eloquently about science and faith will interact with education researchers who examined how people learn about evolution specifically and the processes, nature, and limits of science more generally. Following brief presentations, a moderated discussion will explore ways that this combination of expertise might help to shape science education programs around evolution and other similar "controversial" topics.

For more information: 
Email: Jay Labov

Symposium: The Roles and Intersections between Educational Research and the Sciences

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, Francisco Ayala, Michael Reiss, Brian Alters, Father George Coyne, and Jay Labov
Eugenie Scott
Time: 
12:25pm to 1:55pm
Date: 
April 14, 2009
Location: 
American Education Research Association, Annual Meeting
San Diego Convention Center
Ballroom 6F
San Diego, CA


This symposium will address how scientists, theologians, and education researchers might collaborate more effectively in the future. Scientists and theologians who have written eloquently about science and faith will interact with education researchers who examined how people learn about evolution specifically and the processes, nature, and limits of science more generally. Following brief presentations, a moderated discussion will explore ways that this combination of expertise might help to shape science education programs around evolution and other similar "controversial" topics.

For more information: 
Email: Jay Labov

Creationism After Dover

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, PhD


Time: 
12:00am
Date: 
April 10, 2009
Location: 
Room N1B23
Ramaley Hall
University of Colorado at Boulder


After the failure of Intelligent Design to survive a legal test of its constitutionality (Kitzmiller v Dover) the creationist movement evolved new strategies. These call for teaching the “strengths and weaknesses of evolution” or the “critical analysis of evolution” which are creationism in disguise. In lieu of Dover-like policies promoting the teaching of Intelligent Design, the Discovery Institute has provided model legislation for states to pass to promote these approaches. This “Academic Freedom Act” legislation has popped up in several states already, and reflects the creationism du jour.

For more information: 

Creationism After Dover

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, PhD


Time: 
4:00pm
Date: 
April 10, 2009
Location: 
Room N1B23
Ramaley Hall
University of Colorado at Boulder


After the failure of Intelligent Design to survive a legal test of its constitutionality (Kitzmiller v Dover) the creationist movement evolved new strategies. These call for teaching the “strengths and weaknesses of evolution” or the “critical analysis of evolution” which are creationism in disguise. In lieu of Dover-like policies promoting the teaching of Intelligent Design, the Discovery Institute has provided model legislation for states to pass to promote these approaches. This “Academic Freedom Act” legislation has popped up in several states already, and reflects the creationism du jour.

For more information: 

The Pillars of Creationism

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, PhD

Time: 
3:00am
Date: 
April 8, 2009
Location: 
105 Olin Hall
2190 E. Iliff Avenue
Denver University
Colorado


Three arguments have characterized the creationist movement since the Scopes Trial of 1925. One or more of these “pillars of creationism” are found in any given creationist book, video, letter to the editor, legislation, policy statement – virtually any source. Of most importance to creationists themselves is the concept that evolution and Christian religion are incompatible. They also contend that evolution as a scientific explanation is weak, and on the verge of being abandoned by scientists – who are just not letting the public in on the big secret. Finally, the most successful of the pillars is the “fairness” pillar: the idea that it is only fair to “balance” evolution with the presentation of some alternative. These alternatives have variously included creationism, creation science, intelligent design, and “evidence against evolution.” All of the pillars of creationism have factual or conceptual weaknesses which remove them as serious challenges to evolution, but all three continue to be proposed with success to the public.

For more information: 
Contact: Dean Saitta

The Pillars of Creationism

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, PhD

Time: 
7:00pm
Date: 
April 8, 2009
Location: 
105 Olin Hall
2190 E. Iliff Avenue
Denver University
Colorado


Three arguments have characterized the creationist movement since the Scopes Trial of 1925. One or more of these “pillars of creationism” are found in any given creationist book, video, letter to the editor, legislation, policy statement – virtually any source. Of most importance to creationists themselves is the concept that evolution and Christian religion are incompatible. They also contend that evolution as a scientific explanation is weak, and on the verge of being abandoned by scientists – who are just not letting the public in on the big secret. Finally, the most successful of the pillars is the “fairness” pillar: the idea that it is only fair to “balance” evolution with the presentation of some alternative. These alternatives have variously included creationism, creation science, intelligent design, and “evidence against evolution.” All of the pillars of creationism have factual or conceptual weaknesses which remove them as serious challenges to evolution, but all three continue to be proposed with success to the public.

For more information: 
Contact: Dean Saitta

Darwin, Dover and intelligent design

Featuring: 
Kevin Padian, Ph.D.


Time: 
12:10am
Date: 
April 6, 2009
Location: 
Baker Center Ballroom
Ohio University
Athens, Ohio


Dr. Kevin Padian, NCSE Board President, will present his experiences with the Kitzmiller vs. Dover court case.

With his expertise in phylogenetic relationships, homology, and the nature of science, Dr. Padian was called to testify in the Dover, Pennsylvania court case that put "intelligent design" on trial in 2005. This US Federal Court case was brought against a public school district requiring that "intelligent design" be provided as an alternative to evolution as to explain the origin of life. The plaintiffs successfully argued that intelligent design is a form of creationism, and thus, the school board policy violated the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

For more information: 
Contact: OCEES website

Darwin, Dover and intelligent design

Featuring: 
Kevin Padian, Ph.D.


Time: 
4:10pm
Date: 
April 6, 2009
Location: 
Baker Center Ballroom
Ohio University
Athens, Ohio


Dr. Kevin Padian, NCSE Board President, will present his experiences with the Kitzmiller vs. Dover court case.

With his expertise in phylogenetic relationships, homology, and the nature of science, Dr. Padian was called to testify in the Dover, Pennsylvania court case that put "intelligent design" on trial in 2005. This US Federal Court case was brought against a public school district requiring that "intelligent design" be provided as an alternative to evolution as to explain the origin of life. The plaintiffs successfully argued that intelligent design is a form of creationism, and thus, the school board policy violated the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

For more information: 
Contact: OCEES website

McGill Symposium on Islam and Evolution

Featuring: 
Joshua Rosenau, Taner Edis, Salman Hameed, Ehab Abouheif, Saouma BouJaoude, Minoo Derayeh, A. Uner Turgay, Anila Asghar, Jason WIles, Brian Alters
Time: 
6:00pm
Date: 
March 31, 2009
Location: 

Redpath Museum, Auditorium
McGill University
859 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, Quebec

How is evolution taught and understood in Islamic societies? How do Muslim students, parents, and teachers understand evolutionary science in relation to their religious beliefs?

These questions form the basis of the McGill Symposium on Islam and Evolution, where international experts in Islamic and Religious Studies, Science Education, and Biological Evolution will meet to discuss their views on this important topic.

NCSE Public Information Project Director Joshua Rosenau will present "From the Pillars of Islam to the Pillars of Creation," a paper co-authored with NCSE Director, Religious Community Outreach Peter Hess. The authors examine which core elements of Christian creationist rhetoric in the US have transferred, or failed to transfer into Islamic creationism in Turkey. Rosenau is scheduled to present in the morning panel.

Anila Asghar, Jason Wiles, and Brian Alters, a member of NCSE's board of directors, will present two papers in the afternoon. The first, "Islam, Culture, and Evolutionary Science: Evolution Education in Indonesia," will present results of surveys administered to 1,200 Indonesian high school students, as well as interviews with science/biology teachers, about student and teacher attitudes toward evolution and their views on the relationships of science to religion. The second paper, "Biological Evolution and Islam: The Paradox of Evolution Education in Pakistan," presents a survey of 2000 Pakistani high school students and interviews with their teachers, examining their understanding of evolution and their understanding of the relationship between science and religion.

For more information: 

Contact: Sarah Bean, Evolution Education Research Centre.

Symposium website

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