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The Once and Future Creationism: How Creationism evolves to fit the legal system

Time: 
7:00pm
Date: 
March 25, 2010
Location: 
Museum of Florida History
R.A. Gray Auditorium
500 South Bronough Street
Tallahassee, FL


Although many people erroneously believe that creationism is a thing of the past, it still negatively affects the teaching of science in the United States today. Even though creation science and intelligent design have been defeated in courts, proponents present both as "alternatives" to evolution. Leaders of the antievolution movement, however, have shifted their emphasis to a different approach that is intended both to avoid successful legal challenges and also appeal to American cultural values. This "evidence against evolution" approach arises from both the Supreme Court legal decision striking down the teaching of creation science, and a Senator's attempt to modify the 2001 No Child Left behind education act. It currently takes the form of proposed legislation to protect from legal action teachers who wish to teach alleged “weaknesses of evolution”, or proposed changes to state science education standards encouraging the “critical analysis” (i.e., criticism) of evolution as a student critical thinking exercise. These approaches are far less obvious examples of religious advocacy, and are believed to therefore be able to withstand constitutional challenge.

A talk for the
Tallahassee Scientific Society
co-sponsored by the
Florida State University Department of Biology

Seating is limited for this free event.

Cash bar reception begins at 6PM.

For more information: 
Click HERE

Evolution and Faith

Featuring: 
Peter M.J. Hess, Ph.D.

Time: 
3:30am
Wednesdays: 3, 10, 14, & 24 March
Date: 
March 3, 2010
Location: 
First Presbyterian Church of San Rafael
1510 Fifth Ave. (at "E" St.)
San Rafael, CA


With so much of the public attention in the "Creation vs. Evolution" debate being directed to what it is appropriate to teach in the classroom, what is often left unexamined are the important and interesting implications the theory of evolution holds for our faith journey. This class will explore those dimensions of the conversation. Come join with us as Dr. Peter Hess leads a discussion in the implications of evolution for our faith."

Classes are free; registration unnecessary

For more information: 
Phone the Church Office at 415-456-6760 or email churchoffice@fpcsr.org

Evolution and Faith

Time: 
7:30pm to 9:00pm
Wednesdays: 3, 10, 14, & 24 March
Date: 
March 3, 2010 to March 24, 2010
Location: 
First Presbyterian Church of San Rafael
1510 Fifth Ave. (at "E" St.)
San Rafael, CA


With so much of the public attention in the "Creation vs. Evolution" debate being directed to what it is appropriate to teach in the classroom, what is often left unexamined are the important and interesting implications the theory of evolution holds for our faith journey. This class will explore those dimensions of the conversation. Come join with us as Dr. Peter Hess leads a discussion in the implications of evolution for our faith."

Classes are free; registration unnecessary

For more information: 
Phone the Church Office at 415-456-6760 or email churchoffice@fpcsr.org

Science Literacy: How To Train Teachers, Engage Students, and Maximize Learning

Featuring: 

Eugenie C. Scott, NCSE
Michael W. Klymkowsky, University of Colorado
Jo Ellen Roseman, AAAS Project 2061
Erin M. Furtak, University of Colorado
S. James Gates Jr., University of Maryland
Time: 
9:30pm
Date: 
February 20, 2010
Location: 
Room 3
San Diego Convention Center
111 W. Harbor Drive
San Diego, CA


Science Literacy: How To Train Teachers, Engage Students, and Maximize Learning Scientific literacy is crucial; it is necessary for our future economic competitiveness and the general citizen’s understanding of the value, implications, and limitations of scientific knowledge. So, does our science education system effectively address these equally important outcomes? The answer is complicated by the fact that the ability to successfully produce a relative handful of scientists can obscure gross failures in the education of the public at large. Nevertheless, we can identify key factors that influence science education, including the ability of the system to engage diverse sectors of the population. Among these are the order in which concepts are presented; the methods used to facilitate and reinforce their learning; the strategies used to convince students of their ability to learn; and the methods (i.e., tests) used to monitor their comprehension, competence, and confidence. Are instructors comfortable with what they are called on to teach; are the concepts to be taught presented in an effective sequence and in sufficient depth; do the assessments used measure comprehension and competence; and do methods “turn on” or “turn off” student interest in and appreciation of science? There is substantial data that these goals are not generally met. The speakers will address these issues to promote a critical and cross-disciplinary discussion, and perhaps identify ways forward toward more effective and inclusive science literacy.

For more information: 
Click here

The history and prospects of creationism

Featuring: 
Glenn Branch, NCSE Deputy Director


Time: 
2:00am
Date: 
February 20, 2010
Location: 

Carmichael Library
5605 Marconi Ave
Carmichael CA 95608




For more information: 

The history and prospects of creationism

Time: 
6:00pm
Date: 
February 20, 2010
Location: 

Carmichael Library
5605 Marconi Ave
Carmichael CA 95608




For more information: 

Science Literacy: How To Train Teachers, Engage Students, and Maximize Learning

Time: 
1:30pm to 4:30pm
Date: 
February 20, 2010
Location: 
Room 3
San Diego Convention Center
111 W. Harbor Drive
San Diego, CA


Science Literacy: How To Train Teachers, Engage Students, and Maximize Learning Scientific literacy is crucial; it is necessary for our future economic competitiveness and the general citizen’s understanding of the value, implications, and limitations of scientific knowledge. So, does our science education system effectively address these equally important outcomes? The answer is complicated by the fact that the ability to successfully produce a relative handful of scientists can obscure gross failures in the education of the public at large. Nevertheless, we can identify key factors that influence science education, including the ability of the system to engage diverse sectors of the population. Among these are the order in which concepts are presented; the methods used to facilitate and reinforce their learning; the strategies used to convince students of their ability to learn; and the methods (i.e., tests) used to monitor their comprehension, competence, and confidence. Are instructors comfortable with what they are called on to teach; are the concepts to be taught presented in an effective sequence and in sufficient depth; do the assessments used measure comprehension and competence; and do methods “turn on” or “turn off” student interest in and appreciation of science? There is substantial data that these goals are not generally met. The speakers will address these issues to promote a critical and cross-disciplinary discussion, and perhaps identify ways forward toward more effective and inclusive science literacy.

For more information: 
Click here

Communicating on the State and Local Level: How Can Scientists Support Policy-Makers?

Featuring: 

Eugenie C. Scott, NCSE
Steve Scheider, Stanford University
John Gearhart, Johns Hopkins University
Time: 
4:30pm
Date: 
February 19, 2010
Location: 
Room 7B
San Diego Convention Center
111 W. Harbor Drive
San Diego, CA


In recent years, state legislators and school board members have frequently attempted to undermine scientific research and education. As a result, scientists are often called on to work with policy-makers, but many lack the tools and resources to do so effectively. In particular, few scientists have been trained in communication and public engagement, and lawmakers and the public thus often view science and scientists as elitist and out of touch. Changing these perceptions requires a long-term effort, but this symposium aims to provide some of the groundwork. Specifically, it will explore successful communication and public engagement strategies and how they can be put to use on some of the most talked-about scientific policy issues of the day: evolution, stem cell research, and climate change. Speakers will include public engagement specialists as well as scientists who have extensive experience in working with lawmakers, the media, and the general public. The symposium will take a practical approach, focusing on providing tools, resources, and contacts to help scientists become effective advocates for science and science education at the state and local level.

For more information: 
Click here

Mind Changes: Can Out-of-School Learning Contribute to Evolution Literacy?

Featuring: 

Eugenie C. Scott, Moderator
Martin Weiss, New York Hall of Science
Martin Storskdieck, Institute for Learning Innovation
E. Margaret Evans, University of Michigan
Time: 
6:30pm
Date: 
February 19, 2010
Location: 
Room 16B
San Diego Convention Center
111 W. Harbor Drive
San Diego, CA


While public understanding and acceptance of evolution is partially determined by religious beliefs, cognitive factors also play a critical role. Misconceptions about the underlying science of evolution contribute to the public perception that creationism or intelligent design is on an equal footing with evolution and that children should be taught all points of view. Research into the public’s conceptions of evolution reveals persistent resistance to change through educational interventions. Recent research indicated that barriers to the public acceptance of evolution stem from intuitive reasoning processes that limit understanding of biological phenomena. Specifically, the research suggested that if children are introduced to evolutionary principles, particularly the pre-evolutionary concepts of variation, inheritance, selection, time, and adaptation (VISTA), at an early age, they are more likely to improve their grasp of evolutionary theory. Based on concurrent cognitive, developmental, and educational research, a group of researchers are testing the degree to which informal, museum-based, and age-appropriate interventions prepare children to accept the scientific basis of evolution, by targeting their intuitive pre-evolutionary concepts. This session will present the intervention design, results of research on its effectiveness with children and adults, and discuss implications of the project findings for a broader strategy to foster evolution literacy in the public.

For more information: 
Click here

Mind Changes: Can Out-of-School Learning Contribute to Evolution Literacy?

Time: 
10:30am to 12:00pm
Date: 
February 19, 2010
Location: 
Room 16B
San Diego Convention Center
111 W. Harbor Drive
San Diego, CA


While public understanding and acceptance of evolution is partially determined by religious beliefs, cognitive factors also play a critical role. Misconceptions about the underlying science of evolution contribute to the public perception that creationism or intelligent design is on an equal footing with evolution and that children should be taught all points of view. Research into the public’s conceptions of evolution reveals persistent resistance to change through educational interventions. Recent research indicated that barriers to the public acceptance of evolution stem from intuitive reasoning processes that limit understanding of biological phenomena. Specifically, the research suggested that if children are introduced to evolutionary principles, particularly the pre-evolutionary concepts of variation, inheritance, selection, time, and adaptation (VISTA), at an early age, they are more likely to improve their grasp of evolutionary theory. Based on concurrent cognitive, developmental, and educational research, a group of researchers are testing the degree to which informal, museum-based, and age-appropriate interventions prepare children to accept the scientific basis of evolution, by targeting their intuitive pre-evolutionary concepts. This session will present the intervention design, results of research on its effectiveness with children and adults, and discuss implications of the project findings for a broader strategy to foster evolution literacy in the public.

For more information: 
Click here

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