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The Evolution of Creationism

Time: 
6:30pm
Date: 
February 11, 2010
Location: 
Room 140
Barry Hall Auditorium
NDSU Downtown Campus
Fargo, North Dakota


Since the early part of the last century, American society has been witness to a very public dispute between those who deny the evidence for biological evolution and the scientific community that has been responsible for working to unearth and interpret that evidence. The public image presented by those who reject evolution has taken many forms over the years, from a reliance on the Bible as an inerrant text, to the more recent formulation of "intelligent design," which attempts to present the creationist argument as one of scientifically equal weight to that of evolutionary biology. Dr. Scott will discuss the history of these controversies and offer her thoughts on the future tactics of the creationists.

a talk for the
North Dakota State University's
Darwin Day Celebration


sponsored by the
Biological Sciences Department

For more information: 
Email Peggy Biga

Not Over After Dover: What we learned from Kitzmiller v. Dover

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, Ph.D.


Time: 
11:00pm
Date: 
January 25, 2010
Location: 
Lory Student Center, East Ballroom
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO


The 2005 Kitzmiller v Dover trial was a test of the constitutionality of teaching Intelligent Design - and ID failed. In response, the creationist movement has evolved new strategies calling for teaching the "strengths and weaknesses of evolution" or the "critical analysis of evolution," but these turn out to be creationism in disguise. Dr. Scott will discuss the Kitzmiller trial and its aftermath.

This is a presentation of the
Colloquium in the Life Sciences
sponsored by the graduate students of CSU, and is open to the public.

For more information: 
Contact Leon van Eck at cas_colloquium@mail.colostate.edu

Not Over After Dover: What we learned from Kitzmiller v. Dover

Time: 
3:00pm to 4:00pm
Date: 
January 25, 2010
Location: 
Lory Student Center, East Ballroom
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO


The 2005 Kitzmiller v Dover trial was a test of the constitutionality of teaching Intelligent Design - and ID failed. In response, the creationist movement has evolved new strategies calling for teaching the "strengths and weaknesses of evolution" or the "critical analysis of evolution," but these turn out to be creationism in disguise. Dr. Scott will discuss the Kitzmiller trial and its aftermath.

This is a presentation of the
Colloquium in the Life Sciences
sponsored by the graduate students of CSU, and is open to the public.

For more information: 
Contact Leon van Eck at cas_colloquium@mail.colostate.edu

Evolution vs. Creationism: An Introduction

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, Ph.D.

Time: 
3:00am
Date: 
January 21, 2010
Location: 
The Bone Room
1569 Solano Avenue
Berkeley, CA
510-526-5252


Dr. Eugenie C. Scott will read from the second edition of her book, "Evolution vs Creationism:
An Introduction," discuss the current status of the creationism vs evolution controversy, and answer questions at Berkeley's Bone Room.

This is part of
The Bone Room Presents
lecture series

For more information: 
Click here.
or email The Bone Room

Evolution vs. Creationism: An Introduction

Time: 
7:00pm
Date: 
January 21, 2010
Location: 
The Bone Room
1569 Solano Avenue
Berkeley, CA
510-526-5252


Dr. Eugenie C. Scott will read from the second edition of her book, "Evolution vs Creationism:
An Introduction," discuss the current status of the creationism vs evolution controversy, and answer questions at Berkeley's Bone Room.

This is part of
The Bone Room Presents
lecture series

For more information: 
Click here.
or email The Bone Room

Addressing Creationist Students in the Modern Science Classroom

Featuring: 


Time: 
7:00pm
Date: 
January 16, 2010
Location: 
Sheraton Grand Hotel
1234 J Street
Sacramento, CA

Creationist students pose a challenge to science educators in a number of disciplines. From biology to the earth sciences to anthropology, creationist students are resistant to the findings of science, misunderstand the nature of science, and increasingly assert their right to espouse creationist alternatives to science, especially under the guise of “intelligent design.” This poses a problem for faculty of teacher education programs, who may have received little training regarding how to handle creationist students.

This themed paper set examines the major aspects involved in this issue, and provides concrete advice for educators seeking to respect the religious views of students, while ensuring that preservice teachers are effectively prepared to be excellent science teachers.

Three presenters from the National Center for Science Education, the nation’s leading organization defending the teaching of evolution in public schools, will detail the aspects of this issue. Steven Newton will introduce the topic with a talk titled, “Why Creationism is Still an Issue for the Modern Science Classroom.” Louise Mead will explain how one teacher education program dealt with the presence of creationist students among its teachers in training. Eugenie Scott will talk on the topic of, “How to Prepare Teachers for Dealing with Creationist Students.”

a presentation at the
ASTE 2010
International Conference

For more information: 
Click here

Addressing Creationist Students in the Modern Science Classroom

Time: 
11:00am to 12:00pm
Date: 
January 16, 2010
Location: 
Sheraton Grand Hotel
1234 J Street
Sacramento, CA

Creationist students pose a challenge to science educators in a number of disciplines. From biology to the earth sciences to anthropology, creationist students are resistant to the findings of science, misunderstand the nature of science, and increasingly assert their right to espouse creationist alternatives to science, especially under the guise of “intelligent design.” This poses a problem for faculty of teacher education programs, who may have received little training regarding how to handle creationist students.

This themed paper set examines the major aspects involved in this issue, and provides concrete advice for educators seeking to respect the religious views of students, while ensuring that preservice teachers are effectively prepared to be excellent science teachers.

Three presenters from the National Center for Science Education, the nation’s leading organization defending the teaching of evolution in public schools, will detail the aspects of this issue. Steven Newton will introduce the topic with a talk titled, “Why Creationism is Still an Issue for the Modern Science Classroom.” Louise Mead will explain how one teacher education program dealt with the presence of creationist students among its teachers in training. Eugenie Scott will talk on the topic of, “How to Prepare Teachers for Dealing with Creationist Students.”

a presentation at the
ASTE 2010
International Conference

For more information: 
Click here

Creationism & Climate Change

Featuring: 
Steven Newton, M.S.

Time: 
4:30pm
Date: 
December 16, 2009
Location: 
3020 Moscone West
Moscone Convention Center
747 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA


Although creationists focus on the biological sciences, recently creationists have also expanded their attacks to include the earth sciences, especially on the topic of climate change. The creationist effort to deny climate change, in addition to evolution and radiometric dating, is part of a broader denial of the methodology and validity of science itself. Creationist misinformation can pose a serious problem for science educators, who are further hindered by the poor treatment of the earth sciences and climate change in state science standards. Recent changes to Texas’ science standards, for example, require that students learn “different views on the existence of global warming.” Because of Texas’ large influence on the national textbook market, textbooks presenting non-scientific “different views” about climate change—or simply omitting the subject entirely because of the alleged “controversy”—could become part of K-12 classrooms across the country.

a presentation at the
American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

For more information: 
Click here

Creationism & Climate Change

Time: 
8:30am to 8:45am
Date: 
December 16, 2009
Location: 
3020 Moscone West
Moscone Convention Center
747 Howard Street
San Francisco, CA


Although creationists focus on the biological sciences, recently creationists have also expanded their attacks to include the earth sciences, especially on the topic of climate change. The creationist effort to deny climate change, in addition to evolution and radiometric dating, is part of a broader denial of the methodology and validity of science itself. Creationist misinformation can pose a serious problem for science educators, who are further hindered by the poor treatment of the earth sciences and climate change in state science standards. Recent changes to Texas’ science standards, for example, require that students learn “different views on the existence of global warming.” Because of Texas’ large influence on the national textbook market, textbooks presenting non-scientific “different views” about climate change—or simply omitting the subject entirely because of the alleged “controversy”—could become part of K-12 classrooms across the country.

a presentation at the
American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

For more information: 
Click here

Scientific American Decade 2 Panels

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, Ph.D.

Time: 
8:00am
Date: 
December 8, 2009
Location: 
The Pavilion
Ronald Reagan Building & International Trade Center
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington DC


Forty years ago Americans were putting people on the moon; now fewer U.S. residents are choosing to become scientists at a time when society's greatest challenges require technological solutions. President Obama promised to "restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders." But developing renewable energy sources, stemming climate change, personalizing medicine, and inventing new energy-efficient vehicles will require a science-savvy workforce. Today, less than half of those earning doctorates in the physical sciences, mathematics, and computing are U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

The Soviet launch of Sputnik sparked a renewed national conversation regarding the quality of science education in America. Has the next Sputnik moment arrived? How can we retool the science education process in the U.S. to ensure a bumper crop of scientists and innovators?

attendance at Panel Discussions is by invitation only

For more information: 
Email: Diane Schube, at Scientific American

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