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Despite the Evidence: Rejecting Evolution and Darwin

Time: 
2:00pm
Date: 
November 15, 2009
Location: 
Delegates Hall
Bibliotheca Alexandrina
Alexandria, Egypt


The publication in 1859 of On the Origin of Species was an extraordinary milestone for science, but it also had profound effects on theology, philosophy, literature, and society in general. In On the Origin of Species, Darwin proposed that all living things share common ancestors, and that natural selection was the primary agent of species change. Common ancestry challenges human exceptionalism, and natural selection exacerbates the theodicy problem. Such theological concerns with the implications of evolution weigh especially heavily in North America, where the teaching of evolution has been contentious since the early part of the 20th century. Evolution has also been associated with eugenics, racism, and Social Darwinism, making it anathema to many social and political progressives. The American creationist movement has had a series of distinct emphases over the last century, partly as a function of adapting to constitutional restraint of religious neutrality of governmental institutions. Although creationism grows out of particulars of American culture and history, elements have proven highly exportable, and antievolutionism is becoming more of an international problem.

A presentation in the British Council-sponsored international symposium:
Darwin’s Living Legacy

For more information: 

The Darwin Project: A Dialogue Between Faith and Science

Featuring: 
Peter M. J. Hess, Ph.D. et al.


Time: 
8:00am
Date: 
November 12, 2009
Location: 
Syufy Theatre
2222 Broadway
San Francisco


In celebration of Charles Darwin’s 200th birthday, Convent of the Sacred Heart and Stuart Hall High Schools have invited prominent scientists and theologians for a conference centering on the relationship between God and the truths of evolution. "The Darwin Project: A Dialogue Between Faith and Science" will be an all-day program featuring workshops and panel discussions from virtually every department in both schools. The purpose of this interdisciplinary curriculum is to honor the serious practices and discoveries within the worlds of faith and science.

Students will have the opportunity to listen to and ask questions of professional scientists and theologians including Dr. Stanley Prusiner, Nobel Prize winner; George Coyne, S.J., former Vatican Observatory Director; Dr. Peter Hess, Director, Religious Community Outreach at the National Center for Science Education; Dr. Leslea Hlusko, Associate Professor of Integrated Biology at U.C. Berkeley; and Dr. Francisco J. Ayala, eminent Spanish American biologist and philosopher at U.C. Irvine.

Workshop sessions for students will feature such subjects as Western images of creation, the possibility of God as a mathematician, an analysis of the belief system in the play Inherit the Wind as it relates to 9/11, a student debate on whether intelligent design should be taught in public schools, and sacred stories from around the world.

As a diverse community of culture, religion and scholarship, Convent & Stuart Hall, through this creative event, are seeking to better understand their Catholic identity, which maintains that “scientific truth, which is itself a participation in divine truth, can help philosophy and theology to understand more fully the human person and God’s revelation.” (Pope John Paul ll’s “Address to the Members of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences,” November 2003).

Following the conference, Convent & Stuart Hall will present Inherit the Wind, a theatrical imagining of the famous 1925 “Scopes Monkey Trial” in which the teachings of creationism came up against the teaching of Darwin’s evolutionary theory. The play, by Jerome Lawrence & Robert Edwin Lee, will take place in the Syufy Theatre on Thursday and Friday, November 19 and 20 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, November 21 at 2 p.m.

For more information: 
Contact: Karen Randall
Chair, Convent English Dept.
randall@sacredsf.org
415.563.2900, ext 3122

The Darwin Project: A Dialogue Between Faith and Science

Time: 
12:00am
Date: 
November 12, 2009
Location: 
Syufy Theatre
2222 Broadway
San Francisco


In celebration of Charles Darwin’s 200th birthday, Convent of the Sacred Heart and Stuart Hall High Schools have invited prominent scientists and theologians for a conference centering on the relationship between God and the truths of evolution. "The Darwin Project: A Dialogue Between Faith and Science" will be an all-day program featuring workshops and panel discussions from virtually every department in both schools. The purpose of this interdisciplinary curriculum is to honor the serious practices and discoveries within the worlds of faith and science.

Students will have the opportunity to listen to and ask questions of professional scientists and theologians including Dr. Stanley Prusiner, Nobel Prize winner; George Coyne, S.J., former Vatican Observatory Director; Dr. Peter Hess, Director, Religious Community Outreach at the National Center for Science Education; Dr. Leslea Hlusko, Associate Professor of Integrated Biology at U.C. Berkeley; and Dr. Francisco J. Ayala, eminent Spanish American biologist and philosopher at U.C. Irvine.

Workshop sessions for students will feature such subjects as Western images of creation, the possibility of God as a mathematician, an analysis of the belief system in the play Inherit the Wind as it relates to 9/11, a student debate on whether intelligent design should be taught in public schools, and sacred stories from around the world.

As a diverse community of culture, religion and scholarship, Convent & Stuart Hall, through this creative event, are seeking to better understand their Catholic identity, which maintains that “scientific truth, which is itself a participation in divine truth, can help philosophy and theology to understand more fully the human person and God’s revelation.” (Pope John Paul ll’s “Address to the Members of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences,” November 2003).

Following the conference, Convent & Stuart Hall will present Inherit the Wind, a theatrical imagining of the famous 1925 “Scopes Monkey Trial” in which the teachings of creationism came up against the teaching of Darwin’s evolutionary theory. The play, by Jerome Lawrence & Robert Edwin Lee, will take place in the Syufy Theatre on Thursday and Friday, November 19 and 20 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, November 21 at 2 p.m.

For more information: 
Contact: Karen Randall
Chair, Convent English Dept.
randall@sacredsf.org
415.563.2900, ext 3122

Creation, Design and Evolution: Much Ado about Nothing?

Featuring: 
Peter M. J. Hess, Ph.D.

Time: 
6:45pm
Date: 
November 10, 2009
Location: 
Frey Moot Court Room
University of St. Thomas School of Law
1000 LaSalle Avenue
Minneapolis, MN


Every culture has its views about the universe, about the human person, and about the great metaphysical questions. How do cosmology, anthropology and theology relate to each other? The proper relationship between science and religion, between natural philosophy and religious belief, has preoccupied humans since before the Psalmist rhapsodized that “The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament shows forth his handiwork.” It has been a perennial question in American culture since Cotton Mather penned The Christian Philosopher: a Collection of the Best Discoveries in Nature, with Religious Improvements (1721).

In America this debate has taken some fascinating turns since the proposal of Darwin’s theory of evolution. In the last two decades much energy has gone into the public discussion of evolution, creation, and whether the universe exhibits signs of intelligent design. Dr. Hess will suggest that much of this discussion has been at cross purposes because of linguistic confusion. He will argue both that it is philosophically improper to confuse the proper integrity of scientific and metaphysical discourse, and that both should be taught in public schools. He will further argue that the evolutionary model provides a far richer resource for theology than do the scientific models it replaces.

For more information: 
Click here or email John Sandy at St. Thomas University

Leap of Faith: Intelligent Design’s trajectory after Dover

Featuring: 
Joshua Rosenau
Joshua Rosenau
Time: 
9:50pm
Date: 
November 10, 2009
Location: 

Frey Moot Court Room
University of St. Thomas, School of Law
Minneapolis, MN 55403

NCSE Public Information Project Director Josh Rosenau will describe the current state of the "intelligent design" movement, and the legal prospects of various post-ID strategies, in a symposium on "ID and the Constitution."

University of St. Thomas sealThe symposium will also feature: Peter Hess, NCSE Director, Religious Community Outreach; Casey Luskin, Discovery Institute staffer; David DeWolf, pro-ID legal scholar and professor at Gonzaga University's law school; Patrick Gillen, professor at Ave Maria University's law school and formerly the defense attorney for the Dover school board; Russell Pannier, emeritus professor at William Mitchel College of Law; Thomas Sullivan, Aquinas Chair in Philosophy and Theology at the University of St. Thomas.

Creation, Design and Evolution: Much Ado about Nothing?

Time: 
10:45am
Date: 
November 10, 2009
Location: 
Frey Moot Court Room
University of St. Thomas School of Law
1000 LaSalle Avenue
Minneapolis, MN


Every culture has its views about the universe, about the human person, and about the great metaphysical questions. How do cosmology, anthropology and theology relate to each other? The proper relationship between science and religion, between natural philosophy and religious belief, has preoccupied humans since before the Psalmist rhapsodized that “The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament shows forth his handiwork.” It has been a perennial question in American culture since Cotton Mather penned The Christian Philosopher: a Collection of the Best Discoveries in Nature, with Religious Improvements (1721).

In America this debate has taken some fascinating turns since the proposal of Darwin’s theory of evolution. In the last two decades much energy has gone into the public discussion of evolution, creation, and whether the universe exhibits signs of intelligent design. Dr. Hess will suggest that much of this discussion has been at cross purposes because of linguistic confusion. He will argue both that it is philosophically improper to confuse the proper integrity of scientific and metaphysical discourse, and that both should be taught in public schools. He will further argue that the evolutionary model provides a far richer resource for theology than do the scientific models it replaces.

For more information: 
Click here or email John Sandy at St. Thomas University

Leap of Faith: Intelligent Design’s trajectory after Dover

Joshua Rosenau
Time: 
1:50pm to 2:40pm
Date: 
November 10, 2009
Location: 

Frey Moot Court Room
University of St. Thomas, School of Law
Minneapolis, MN 55403

NCSE Public Information Project Director Josh Rosenau will describe the current state of the "intelligent design" movement, and the legal prospects of various post-ID strategies, in a symposium on "ID and the Constitution."

University of St. Thomas sealThe symposium will also feature: Peter Hess, NCSE Director, Religious Community Outreach; Casey Luskin, Discovery Institute staffer; David DeWolf, pro-ID legal scholar and professor at Gonzaga University's law school; Patrick Gillen, professor at Ave Maria University's law school and formerly the defense attorney for the Dover school board; Russell Pannier, emeritus professor at William Mitchel College of Law; Thomas Sullivan, Aquinas Chair in Philosophy and Theology at the University of St. Thomas.

Coming Soon to a Community Near You: Creationism Du Jour

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, Ph.D.

Time: 
9:30pm
Date: 
November 6, 2009
Location: 
Murrow/White/Lisagor Rooms
13th Floor
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington DC

Dr. Scott will talk about the latest manifestations of creationism, such as proposed “Academic Freedom” bills claiming teachers need “protection” teaching “alternative theories to evolution” – which even a brief exposure to the history of the creationism controversy reveals is a euphemism for creationism.

A panel on science policy organized by
The American Humanist Association

Other panelists:
Dr. Barbara Forrest: The Louisiana Science Education Act
Dr. Ken Miller: The Evolution Wars. Are they Really about Science, or Is Something Else Involved?

Free > > > public invited

For more information: 

Coming Soon to a Community Near You: Creationism Du Jour

Time: 
1:30pm to 2:45pm
Date: 
November 6, 2009
Location: 
Murrow/White/Lisagor Rooms
13th Floor
National Press Club
529 14th Street NW
Washington DC

Dr. Scott will talk about the latest manifestations of creationism, such as proposed “Academic Freedom” bills claiming teachers need “protection” teaching “alternative theories to evolution” – which even a brief exposure to the history of the creationism controversy reveals is a euphemism for creationism.

A panel on science policy organized by
The American Humanist Association

Other panelists:
Dr. Barbara Forrest: The Louisiana Science Education Act
Dr. Ken Miller: The Evolution Wars. Are they Really about Science, or Is Something Else Involved?

Free > > > public invited

For more information: 

Darwin’s Impact on Science and Society

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, Ph.D.

Time: 
9:00pm
Date: 
November 4, 2009
Location: 
Alexander Fine Arts Auditorium
Concord University
Athens, West Virginia



Charles Darwin's publication of On the Origin of Species in 1859 was an extraordinary milestone for science, but it also had profound effects on theology, philosophy, literature, and society in general. Nowhere is this more true than in the United States, where the teaching of evolution has been contentious since the early part of the 20th century. Why have Darwin's ideas been so valuable -- and yet so controversial? Reasons for the controversy lie not in science, but in history and culture.

A presentation of the
CONCORD UNIVERSITY ARTIST-LECTURE SERIES

For more information: 

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