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Global Changes, Local Impacts

Featuring: 
Minda Berbeco, Ph.D.

Minda Berbeco, Ph.D.

Time: 
4:30pm
23:30 UTC / 7:30pm Eastern
Date: 
April 16, 2014
Location: 

This is a free webinar.

Register HERE

How can educators teach children about local impacts of climate change? Where can they find good resources for activities and up-to-date scientific information from reputable sources? Minda Berbeco will be talking about the newly released National Climate Assessment, a scientific and governmental resource that demonstrates the local impacts on climate change and projections for the future. She will present on how to bring the NCA into the classroom, and what vetted resources are available. We will focus on resources to make climate change local and relevant.

This webinar is hosted by the

Will Steger Foundation

For more information: 

NCSE Webinar: Using the National Climate Assessment in Classrooms and Communities

Featuring: 
Minda Berbeco, Ph.D.

Minda Berbeco, Ph.D.

Time: 
11:00am
18:00 UTC / 2pm Eastern
Date: 
April 30, 2014
Location: 

This is a free webinar.

Register HERE

How will climate change affect our communities? How can we evaluate news stories about the effects of climate change in your area? What can you do to reach out to your local media and educators, to encourage them to explore the local impacts of climate change?

It can be hard for teachers and others seeking to inform the public about climate change to stay on top of the best science. Not only are climate change deniers invested in obscuring that science, but the science itself is advancing rapidly, making it hard for non-specialists to stay up to date. Fortunately, help is on the way through the National Climate Assessment.

This report from the US government—due in May—evaluates, integrates and assesses observed and projected impacts of climate change across the country, examining how climate change will affect different communities and regions. It will be a tremendous resource for teachers, for parents, and for anyone trying to connect global climate change to local concerns.

To learn how we can make the best use of this tool, join us for a discussion with a panel of climate change specialists. These specialists will address how you can use the report to learn how climate change is already affecting your community, how to bring climate change to the forefront of local media coverage, and how teachers can use the report to bring climate change into classrooms.

Panelists will include: Emily Cloyd, Public Participation and Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment at USGCRP, the federal agency developing the National Climate Assessment; Paige Knappenberger, media relations associate at Climate Nexus, who tracks media coverage and helps communities connect with media outlets to address climate change; Amanda Rycerz, research officer at Habitat 7, website developers of for NCA. Moderator Minda Berbeco is a Programs and Policy Director at NCSE specializing in climate change, working with parents and educators to support the good teaching of climate change science in public schools.

Why do people reject good science? Reflections on the evolution and climate science wars

Featuring: 
Eugenie C. Scott, Ph.D.

Eugenie C. Scott

Date: 
May 17, 2014
Location: 

Coast Kamloops Hotel & Conference Centre
1250 Rogers Way
Kamloops, British Columbia

 

 

Scientists are often puzzled when members of the public reject what we consider to be well-founded explanations. They can’t understand why the presentation of scientific data and theory doesn’t suffice to convince others of the validity of “controversial” topics like evolution and climate change. Recent research highlights the importance of ideology in shaping what scientific conclusions are considered reliable and acceptable. This research is quite relevant to both the evolution wars and the public’s opposition to climate change.

Presentation at the
Imagine No Religion Conference
sponsored by the
Kamloops Centre for Rational Thought

For more information: 

Revolutionizing Science & Mathematics Education: the global change challenge

Featuring: 
Mark McCaffrey (NCSE)

Mark McCaffrey

Time: 
9:00am
Date: 
May 19, 2014
Location: 

University of California
Berkeley, California

 

A Plenary presentation at the

Mathematics of Planet Earth:

Workshop on Global Change

For more information: 

A Discernible Human Influence on Global Climate

Featuring: 
Benjamin D. Santer, Ph.D.

Eugenie C. Scott

Date: 
May 31, 2014
Location: 

SkeptiCAL 2014
Oakland Asian Cultural Center
388 Ninth Street
Oakland, California

 

Human-caused climate change is not a hypothetical future event. It is real, and we are experiencing it in our lifetimes. Despite the compelling evidence of human effects on global climate, there is a continuing need for scientists to answer the question "How do we know it’s us?" Fingerprint studies use complex computer models of the climate system to understand how geographical patterns of temperature and moisture (and many other climatic variables) may change in response to human influences. SkeptiCAL 14The message from this body of research is that observed changes in many different (and independently-measured) aspects of the climate system cannot be explained by natural causes alone.

There are several common criticisms of IPCC and NAS "discernible human influence findings." Rather than simply dismissing such criticism, it is more powerful to perform the research necessary to determine whether the criticism has scientific validity. Scientific responses to two incorrect claims are illustrative: that "global warming stopped in 1998", and that computer models systematically underestimate the observed decadal variability of atmospheric temperature.

For more information: 

Visit the Grand Canyon with NCSE!

Featuring: 
NCSE's Steven Newton, Eugenie Scott, and Joshua Rosenau
Date: 
July 3, 2014 to July 11, 2014
Location: 

Grand Canyon, Arizona


Twenty-two lucky members will raft the Grand Canyon from Marble Canyon to Diamond Creek, experiencing one of the most beautiful and majestic natural features on the planet.

Of course, as NCSE's Josh Rosenau will inform the rafters, the whole Colorado plateau was laid down by the receding waters of Noah's Flood about 4,327 years ago, and the Grand Canyon itself was gouged catastrophically in a matter of days. Geologist Steven Newton will present the standard geological history of Grand Canyon to the rafters — and "they can make up their own minds."

NCSE's "Creation/Evolution Grand Canyon Raft Trip" is a wonderful way to learn about the creationism/evolution controversy in a fabulous natural setting.

 
For more information: 

Click here for more information or e-mail NCSE.