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Evolution Learning Community Encourages Dialog on Evolution at UNC Wilmington

Title: 
Evolution Learning Community Encourages Dialog on Evolution at UNC Wilmington
Author(s): 
Dana Fischetti
Issue: 
1

For the past three years, the Evolution Learning Community (ELC) at the University of North Carolina, Wilmington, has sponsored a variety of speakers, courses and public events related to the study of Darwin and evolution. These activities will culminate in the year-long commemoration in 2009 of the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On The Origin of Species.

Year: 
2009
Date: 
January–February
Page(s): 
22–23
About the Author(s): 
Dana Fischetti
Manager, News and Media Services
Marketing and Communications
University of North Carolina, Wilmington
601 S College Road
Wilmington NC 28403-5993
fischettid@uncw.edu

Dana Fischetti is manager of news and media relations at the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. She has worked in the marketing/public relations field in a variety of capacities in both corporate and higher education settings. As part of her current role, she is providing publicity and media relations support to UNC Wilmington’s multidisciplinary Evolution Learning Community.
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Charles Darwin: Botanist

Title: 
Charles Darwin: Botanist
Author(s): 
Sara B Hoot
Issue: 
1

Introduction

While Charles Darwin is famous throughout the world for the development of the theory of evolution and natural selection, few appreciate that he was also a preeminent botanist. Darwin’s work in botany is extremely varied and includes experiments that are still cited in college-level textbooks because of their elegant experimental design and results. And of course, Darwin’s botanical observations, along with his extensive knowledge of many other areas of science (for example, geology and zoology), were involved in shaping his ideas on evolution.

Year: 
2009
Date: 
January–February
Page(s): 
19—21
About the Author(s): 

Sara B Hoot
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
PO Box 413
Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
hoot@uwm.edu

Sara B Hoot is Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and Director of the UWM Herbarium. She works in the field of systematic and evolutionary botany, where her research involves deriving evolutionary trees for diverse plant groups, using molecular and traditional data. She has published widely and has spoken worldwide on topics related to her work (for example, Menispermaceae, Ranunculaceae, Anemone, Isoetes). One of her favorite side projects and speaking topics is Charles Darwin and his botanical work.

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Why Re-Invent the Crystal?

Title: 
Why Re-Invent the Crystal?
Author(s): 
Gary Hurd
Issue: 
5–6

Creationists attack the question of the origin of life because few scientists are sufficiently familiar with the current research to explain it. The movie Expelled further obscured the issue by dishonest reporting.

Year: 
2008
Date: 
September–December
Page(s): 
54–55
About the Author(s): 
Gary Hurd
c/o NCSE
PO Box 9477
Berkeley CA 94709-0477
ncseoffice@ncseweb.org

Gary Hurd received a doctorate in social science (emphasis in anthropology) from the University of California, Irvine, in 1976. He was a medical researcher and professor of psychiatry at the Medical College of Georgia in 1986 for ten years before returning full-time to archaeology. He became active in resisting the creationist attack on education working at a small natural history museum. His contributed chapter to Why Intelligent Design Fails (edited by Matt Young and Taner Edis; New Brunswick [NJ]: Rutgers University Press, 2004) was cited in the decision in Kitzmiller v Dover.

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Divergence over "Expelled"

Title: 
Divergence over Expelled
Author(s): 
Glenn Branch
Issue: 
5–6

Organizations with a stake in the creationism/evolution controversy reacted to Expelled in a variety of ways. Thanks in part to a zealous campaign on the part of the film’s producers, creationist organizations generally lauded and even helped to promote the film — although there was a conspicuous and honorable exception in the old-earth creationist ministry Reasons to Believe.

Year: 
2008
Date: 
September–December
Page(s): 
52–53
About the Author(s): 
Glenn Branch
NCSE
PO Box 9477
Berkeley CA 94709-0477
branch@ncseweb.org

Glenn Branch is NCSE’s deputy director.
topics: 
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"Expelled" and the Reviewers

Title: 
Expelled and the Reviewers
Author(s): 
Glenn Branch
Issue: 
5–6

The creationist propaganda movie Expelled was anything but a critical favorite, with the Rotten Tomatoes movie review website reporting that only 10% of reviews (4 of 40) were favorable and summarizing the critical consensus as “Full of patronizing, poorly structured arguments, Expelled is a cynical political stunt in the guise of a documentary” (www.rottentomatoes.com/ m/expelled_no_intelligence_allowed/).

Year: 
2008
Date: 
September–December
Page(s): 
24–25
About the Author(s): 
Glenn Branch
NCSE
PO Box 9477
Berkeley CA 94709-0477
branch@ncseweb.org

Glenn Branch is NCSE’s deputy director.
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RNCSE 28 (5—6)

Issue: 
5–6
Year: 
2008
Date: 
September–December
Articles available online are listed below.
Click "Print Edition Contents" for list of articles in the print edition.
Media Type: 

A Rude Introduction to "Expelled"

Title: 
A Rude Introduction to Expelled
Author(s): 
Eugenie C Scott
Issue: 
5–6

I meet a whole lot of creationists in my job, as one might expect. Some are confrontational or even rude; most are civil; a few are cordial — sometimes a bit too cordial, like the fellow who offered to take me out for dinner and dancing the next time I happened to be in his town. It is all part of the routine. But when they flat-out lie to me about what they are doing, I get angry.

Year: 
2008
Date: 
September–December
Page(s): 
11–12
About the Author(s): 
Eugenie C Scott
NCSE
PO Box 9477
Berkeley CA 94709-0477
scott@ncseweb.org

Eugenie C Scott is NCSE’s executive director.
topics: 
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RNCSE 28 (4)

Issue: 
4
Year: 
2008
Date: 
July–August
Articles available online are listed below.
Click "Print Edition Contents" for list of articles in the print edition.
Media Type: 

Review: Darwin Strikes Back

Year: 
2008
Title: 
Darwin Strikes Back: Defending the Science of Intelligent Design
Issue: 
4
Author(s): 
Thomas Woodward
Date: 
July–August

In Darwin Strikes Back, Thomas Woodward presents himself as an arbiter between evolution and “intelligent design” (ID). His verdict is that scientists have responded to ID with heat and venom, but have not effectively refuted ID claims.

There are three general types of difficulty with Woodward’s book:

Grand Rapids (MI): Baker Books, 2006. 224 pages
Page(s): 
35–36
Reviewer: 
Jason Rosenhouse
About the Author(s): 
Jason Rosenhouse
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
James Madison University
Harrisonburg VA 22807
rosenhjd@jmu.edu

Jason Rosenhouse is Associate Professor of Mathematics at James Madison University. He offers commentary on the endless dispute between evolution and creationism on his blog at www.scienceblogs.com/evolutionblog/.
Media Type: 
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Calvin Meets the Hominins: A Brief History of Creationism in South Africa

Title: 
Calvin Meets the Hominins: A Brief History of Creationism in South Africa
Author(s): 
LW Retief
Issue: 
4

The history of South African creationism from the 20th century onward is inextricably intertwined with the political course of the country. The Netherlands established a colony at the southern tip of Africa in 1652. The settlers, spreading northwards, were followed first by French Huguenots and later by the British. The British largely retained their language and customs, unlike the Dutch and French who had been more cut off from their native countries. By the 1930s, this mix produced a uniquely South African language and culture.

Year: 
2008
Date: 
July–August
Page(s): 
32–34
About the Author(s): 
LW Retief
5N Agapanthus Avenue
Welgedacht, Bellville 7530, South Africa
leonr@iafrica.com

After obtaining a master’s degree in biochemistry, LW Retief studied medicine and now practices in Bellville, near Cape Town. He is an Afrikaansspeaking agnostic happily married to a devoutly Catholic English-speaking South African. Apart from studying creationism and evolution his other hobbies are opera and motor sport.
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