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"Still trying to get creationism in science classes"

Lauri LeboLauri Lebo

Writing on Religion Dispatches (August 11, 2010), Lauri Lebo anticipates the fifth anniversary of Kitzmiller v. Dover by rehearsing the connections between "intelligent design" and creationism, both in Dover, Pennsylvania, in 2005 and in Livingston Parish, Louisiana, in 2010.

Polling evolution down under

A national survey reveals that one in ten Australians do not believe in evolution — and three in ten think that humans lived at the same time as dinosaurs.

The return of Stick Science

Stick Science — the science cartoon contest sponsored by Florida Citizens for Science, a grassroots organization defending and promoting the integrity of science education in Florida — is back!

Reflections on the Scopes trial from HNN

The History News Network commemorated the eighty-fifth anniversary of the Scopes trial — which ended on July 21, 1925 — by commissioning two essays to mark the occasion.

American Academy of Religion on teaching creationism

It is wrong to teach creation science or intelligent design in the science classroom, according to the American Academy of Religion.

Forrest blasts the LSEA

Barbara ForrestBarbara Forrest

Writing in the Shreveport Times (July 18, 2010), Barbara Forrest blasted the Louisiana Science Education Act, which opened the door for creationism to be taught in the state's public schools.

Polling evolution in three countries

A new poll indicates that public acceptance of evolution is significantly higher in Great Britain and Canada than in the United States.

Comer loses appeal

Chris ComerChris Comer

In a decision issued on July 2, 2010, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit upheld a lower court's decision that the Texas Education Agency's policy requiring "neutrality" of its employees when "talking about evolution and creationism" is not unconstitutional.

A legal defeat for the ICR

The Institute for Creation Research suffered a significant legal defeat in its lawsuit over the Texas Higher Education Coordination Board's 2008 decision to deny the ICR's request for a state certificate of authority to offer a master's degree in science education from its graduate school.

A timely warning from Louisiana

As the environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico worsens, a columnist finds it ironic that the state's politicians are now "seeking the brightest minds in science and engineering to help" when they "have built their careers by pandering to large anti-science constituencies in our state."

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