Latest News

"Origins Science" Bill in Ohio

On January 23, 2002 House Bill 481 was introduced in the Ohio General Assembly. This bill would require that "origins science" be "taught objectively and without religious, naturalistic, or philosophic bias or assumption." Although the bill does not contain the words "biology" or "evolution", it uses the phrase "origin of life and its diversity" several times, as well as "origins science".

Pennsylvannia School District Votes for Creationism Seminar

The West Green School Board in Rogersville, Pennsylvania voted on Thursday, January 24th, to allow a Biblical Creationist to give a creationism seminar to students during class time. Those not wishing to attend could choose not to do so.

High School Principal Brian Jackson reviewed a tape from Creationist Steve Grohman, who asserts that evolution is not true science and both creationism and evolution should be taught, according to the Observer-Reporter.

New Anti-Evolution Legislation Introduced

On January 18, 2002 a new anti-evolution bill was introduced in the Washington State Senate and referred to the Education Committee. According to the bill's digest, SB 6500: "Finds that the teaching of the theory of evolution in the common schools of the state of Washington is repugnant to the principles of the Declaration of Independence and thereby unconstitutional and unlawful.

Ohio BOE to Hold Panel Discussion on Intelligent Design

The Ohio Board of Education will hold a panel discussion featuring both advocates and opponents of including intelligent design (ID) in the newly drafted statewide science standards at its March meeting. The decision to hold the discussion came after a contentious meeting on Sunday, January 14th, at which lawyer John Calvert, of the Kansas based Intelligent Design Network, made the case for inclusion of the controversial field in the standards. Opponents of ID were not allowed to speak at the meeting.

Washington State Disclaimer Bill Still in Committee

Senate Bill 6058 was continued into the current session of the Washington state legislature on January 14, 2002. The bill would require "all science textbooks purchased with state moneys" to contain an evolution disclaimer very similar to that required in Alabama since 1995. The bill received its first reading in February of 2001 and was referred to the Education Committee, where it stalled. It was continued in April, 2001 in a special session, but again no action was taken.

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed