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Matzke's Kitzmas tree in the news

Nick Matzke outside the Rhea County, Tennessee, courthouse, where John T. Scopes was tried in 1925.Nick Matzke outside the Rhea County, Tennessee, courthouse, where John T. Scopes was tried in 1925

Nick Matzke's "The Evolution of Antievolution Policies after Kitzmiller v. Dover" (PDF; subscription required), a new paper forthcoming in Science, is receiving plenty of press coverage. As NCSE previously reported, the paper shows that even though creationism is getting stealthier in the wake of legal defeats such as Kitzmiller v. Dover, techniques from modern evolutionary biology reveal how creationist legislation is evolving.

Matzke's Kitzmas tree!

Figure from "The Evolution of Antievolution Policies After Kitzmiller v. Dover"

In a new paper (PDF; subscription required) forthcoming in Science, Nick Matzke shows that even though creationism is getting stealthier in the wake of legal defeats such as Kitzmiller v. Dover, techniques from modern evolutionary biology reveal how creationist legislation is evolving. Using data collected by NCSE and state-of-the-art phylogenetic analysis, Matzke constructed a phylogenetic tree of seventy-five distinct antievolution bills and policies, reconstructing their genealogical relationships with a high degree of confidence.

A glimpse of On the Wing

On the Wing cover

NCSE is pleased to offer a free preview (PDF) of David E. Alexander's On the Wing: Insects, Pterosaurs, Birds, Bats and the Evolution of Animal Flight (Oxford University Press, 2015).

Darwin Day resolution in Congress

Jim HimesJim Himes

House Resolution 548 (PDF), introduced in the United States House of Representatives on December 3, 2015, would, if passed, express the House's support of designating February 12, 2016, as Darwin Day, and its recognition of "Charles Darwin as a worthy symbol on which to celebrate the achievements of reason, science, and the advancement of human knowledge."

Utah adopts new middle school science standards

The Utah state board of education voted 11-4 on December 4, 2015, to adopt a new set of science standards for grades 6-8, according to a December 4, 2015, press release. Included, despite early signs of controversy, are evolution and climate change.

 

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