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US House of Representatives, 1924

The first time the US Congress became involved in anti-evolution legislation was in 1924, with the House of Representatives House Resolution 8839, District of Columbia Appropriations Bill for 1925. Representative John W. Summers attached two amendments as riders to the bill that prohibited any appropriations for the District of Columbia be used for the salaries of supervisory positions in the school systems, as well as primary instructor positions.

Texas, 1923

Texas' 1923 HCR 6 is largely identical to Florida's HCR 7 of the same year in such, that if passed, HCR 6 would have been a nonbinding resolution, but would have condemned the teaching of evolution, stating, "it is improper and subversive to the best interest of the people of this State for any professor, teacher or instructor in the public schools, universities and colleges of this state, supported in whole or in part by public taxation to teach or permit to be taught atheism or agnosticism or to teach as true Darwinism, or any other hypothesis that links man in blood relationship to any o

Florida, 1923

Florida's introduction to anti-evolution legislation began with HCR 7. Introduced in 1923, the Florida House and Senate passed a non-binding resolution that condemned the teaching of evolution, stating, "it is improper and subversive to the best interest of the people of this State for any professor, teacher or instructor in the public schools and colleges in this State, supported in whole or in part by public taxes, to teach or permit to be taught atheism, or agnosticism or to teach as true Darwinism, or any hypothesis that links man in blood relationship to any other form of life." 

Tennessee, 1923

HB 947, Tennessee's House version of SB 681, introduced by Representative Haynie, would have, if enacted, made it, "unlawful to teach or permit to be taught in any institution of learning, supported by public taxation, atheism, agnosticism, Darwinism, or any other hypothesis that links man in blood relationship to any other form of life." The bill did not pass after it was returned by the Committee on Education with a recommendation for rejection.

Tennessee, 1923

Tennessee's first anti-evolution bill, SB 681 proposed by Senator Whitfield in 1923, would have, if enacted, made it, "unlawful to teach or permit to be taught in any institution of learning, supported by public taxation, atheism, agnosticism, Darwinism, or any other hypothesis that links man in blood relationship to any other form of life." The bill failed to pass after it was returned with a reccommendation for rejection by the Committee on Education.

Alabama, 1923

Alabama's first anti-evolution bill started with Senate Joint Resolution (SJR) 55, which would have, if enacted, prohibted the teaching of, "Atheism, Agnosticism, Darwinism, or any other hypothesis that links man in blood relationship to any other form of life." The originial form of the bill made it through the Standing Committee on Education with a subsitute that contained toned-down language that no longer explicitly mentioned Atheism, Agnosticism, or Darwinism, but still contained, "any hypothesis that links man in blood relationships to any other form of life." The bill was indefinitel

Oklahoma, 1923

Oklahoma's introduction into the anti-evolution legislation battles began with an ammendment to HB 197, and was also the first bill to pass in the United States that explicitly prohibited teaching evolution in the public school system. The bill started as an approprations measure that provided money to purchase textbooks in the state's public schools. An ammendment to the bill was later introduced by Representative J. L.

Iowa, 1923

A House FIle introduced in 1923 in Iowa, would have set aside a half day each week in schools within Iowa for, "the purpose of imparting moral and religious instruction to the pupils of such schools." Although not explicitly anti-evolution in it's language, the file's message -- that it's critica for studentsl to embrace, "Bible study, Christian doctrine, the foundation of the moral law, the obligation of obedience to such law and  the relationship that exists between the moral, the spiritual and the material realms," is a clear breach of Church and State in the public school system, and fi

Texas, 1923

Texas' 1923 HB 97, would have, if enacted, prohibted the teaching of evolution and use of textbooks containing lessons on evolution in any educational institution funded by state taxes. 

South Carolina, 1922

Proposed in 1922 in South Carolina, this ammendment to the General Approprations bill would have, if enacted, prohibited the flow of monies appropriated for the use in the State's public education system to institutions that taught, permitted the teaching of, or followed "the cult known as Darwinism." The amendment was originally passed in the Senate, but was later eliminated from the bill by a conference committee charged with correcting discrepencies between versions of the bill as passed by the Senate and by the House.

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