You are here

Texas, 1925

Texas' HB 378 contained all the ingredients necessary to weed out evolution in Texas public schools: the explicit prohibition of teaching evolution in the Texas public school systems; the termination of one's position and salary if found guilty of teaching evolution; a monetary fine for violating the provisions of the bill; and formal steps one could take to report someone teaching evolution. The bill went through the Committee on Education with a favorable report, but was ultimately not passed.

Tennessee, 1925

Tennessee's 1925 HB 252, was an extensive bill that if enacted, would have imposed strict requirements on school boards and teachers with the aim of vetting out atheists in the Tennessee public school system. HB 252 imposed a mandatory oath of office of sorts, by forcing all those hoping to attain a teaching position in Tennessee to state their belief in God and Jesus in writing, "all teachers employed by any [Tennessee Boards of Education] shall before entering upon his or her duties as teacher certify in writing that he or she meets the requirements...

Tennessee, 1925

Tennessee's infamous 'Butler Act', HB 185 was the bill that founded the laws underlying John Scopes arrest upon teaching evolutionary in a Tennessee public high school, and his subsequent infamous Scopes 'Monkey' Trial and conviction.

Oklahoma, 1925

Introduced in 1925, Oklahoma's HB 162 had the same purpose as the state's senate accompanying bill, SB 54 - repealing Oklahoma's 1923 HB 197, which restricted textbooks that could be used in Oklahoma's public schools, specifically textbooks in which, "no copyright shall be purchased, nor textbook adopted that teaches the 'Materialistic Conception of History' (i.e.) the Darwin Theory of Creation versus the Bible Account of Creation." Although HB 162 did not pass, SB 54 did, thus effec

Oklahoma, 1925

Oklahoma's 1925 SB 54 was created to correct the folly of Oklahoma's HB 197, which was passed in 1923. HB 197. HB 197 enacted laws creating a system for free textbooks in the state's public schools.

US House of Representatives, 1924

The first time the US Congress became involved in anti-evolution legislation was in 1924, with the House of Representatives House Resolution 8839, District of Columbia Appropriations Bill for 1925. Representative John W. Summers attached two amendments as riders to the bill that prohibited any appropriations for the District of Columbia be used for the salaries of supervisory positions in the school systems, as well as primary instructor positions.

Texas, 1923

Texas' 1923 HCR 6 is largely identical to Florida's HCR 7 of the same year in such, that if passed, HCR 6 would have been a nonbinding resolution, but would have condemned the teaching of evolution, stating, "it is improper and subversive to the best interest of the people of this State for any professor, teacher or instructor in the public schools, universities and colleges of this state, supported in whole or in part by public taxation to teach or permit to be taught atheism or agnosticism or to teach as true Darwinism, or any other hypothesis that links man in blood relationship to any o

Florida, 1923

Florida's introduction to anti-evolution legislation began with HCR 7. Introduced in 1923, the Florida House and Senate passed a non-binding resolution that condemned the teaching of evolution, stating, "it is improper and subversive to the best interest of the people of this State for any professor, teacher or instructor in the public schools and colleges in this State, supported in whole or in part by public taxes, to teach or permit to be taught atheism, or agnosticism or to teach as true Darwinism, or any hypothesis that links man in blood relationship to any other form of life." 

Tennessee, 1923

HB 947, Tennessee's House version of SB 681, introduced by Representative Haynie, would have, if enacted, made it, "unlawful to teach or permit to be taught in any institution of learning, supported by public taxation, atheism, agnosticism, Darwinism, or any other hypothesis that links man in blood relationship to any other form of life." The bill did not pass after it was returned by the Committee on Education with a recommendation for rejection.

Tennessee, 1923

Tennessee's first anti-evolution bill, SB 681 proposed by Senator Whitfield in 1923, would have, if enacted, made it, "unlawful to teach or permit to be taught in any institution of learning, supported by public taxation, atheism, agnosticism, Darwinism, or any other hypothesis that links man in blood relationship to any other form of life." The bill failed to pass after it was returned with a reccommendation for rejection by the Committee on Education.

Pages

Subscribe to general