About this issue and the next . . .

Creation Evolution Journal
Title: 
About this issue and the next . . .
Volume: 
4
Number: 
4
Quarter: 
Fall
Page(s): 
Inside cover
Year: 
1984

In this issue, we feature a mixture of articles on both science and philosophy. David Milne leads off by responding to an important but outrageously flawed argument that creationists use for a young earth. Ronald Pine follows with an explanation of why creationists who have degrees in science aren't necessarily scientists. He supports his points by providing standards for judging what is science and what is pseudoscience. And Robert Price, always enjoyed for his explorations into the theology of creationism, now shows how creationism is merely a branch of fundamentalist apologetics.

Also in this issue, we carry over some important discussions from our last issue. Astronomer Steven Shore elaborates on the points made by Frank Awbrey about the creationist space dust arguments. Creationist Norman Geisler comes back with a rebuttal to earlier responses to his article on design, and Frederick Edwords follows with a counter-rebuttal. The "Letters to the Editor" column is particularly lively, since many of the writers not only respond to last issue's articles but to some of the letters as well.

This sort of exchange will have to take a hiatus in Issue XV, however, which will be devoted entirely to the scientific examination of creationist claims that human and dinosaur footprints appear side-by-side in the prehistoric limestone of the Paluxy River in Texas. Creation/Evolution financed a team of four scientists to measure and study the prints. They explored the area in 1982 and 1983 and even observed the creationists at work uncovering the prints. Since so many readers have been eagerly awaiting the results of this study, Issue XV is already in preparation so that it can be rushed to you. We know you'll enjoy it.

This version might differ slightly from the print publication.