Last week on Fossil Friday, I presented you with a tricky identification task. This egg-shaped rock was far afield from the jaws, spines and shells you've been used to.

So what was this unique rock? It was a dinosaur gastrolith from the late Jurassic!

What is a gastrolith?

From the UCMP:

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Last week’s winner of Fossil Friday, GrizzlyD, requested that we do a pseudofossil this week.

“I work at a museum and have to crush many hopes of ‘dinosaur eggs’ that are just round rocks,” he said.

But why would I give you a pseudofossil, when I have a giant archive of real fossils to work from?

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Did former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, former Treasury Secretary and Goldman Sachs CEO Hank Paulson, and retired hedge fund-turned climate action advocate Tom Steyer–the three musketeers behind the just-published Risky Business report–ever see the 1983 movie Risky Business?

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Last week on Fossil Friday, I presented some not-so-tiny toes with some pretty big hints. I said that the fossil was found in what is now Utah, and it dates back to the Jurassic. There was a lot of debate in the comments section, including a  discussion of dinosaur gang colors (I don't want to know...)

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Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology, Claremont, California. 

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Neil deGrasse Tyson stares at the sun.Neil deGrasse Tyson stares at the Sun. Don't try this at home, unless you, too, are a professional astronomer.

In this week’s episode of Cosmos, Neil deGrasse Tyson dug deep into the science of climate change, and offered his vision of how we can solve it.

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This whole month, Fossil Friday is “fossil by request.” Want to see a pile o’ marsupial teeth? Want me to dig into the La Brea tar pits? Are you an ammonite addict? Your wish is my command!

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Sunday the 18th's episode of Cosmos begins with the flood myth (the Babylonian version featuring Gilgamesh, not the gritty reboot with Noah). Thereafter, Neil deGrasse Tyson takes us to the early Earth, asks how the first life arrived on our planet, and speculates about how life might move between planets and even galaxies. And then he addresses the present and the future with a meditation on how civilizations rise and fall.

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