Photo of LEED Gold Great Neck Middle School courtesy of Virginia Beach City Public SchoolsSome say climate change is too hard to teach to kids because it's so depressing...or too controversial...but here’s one school district that has turned that idea on its ear!

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It may be possible to teach about energy without ever digging into the dynamics of human-caused climate change. (Quick note: I don’t  endorse that tack, but it’s possible.) Indeed, many energy education programs sidestep or avoid climate change altogether.

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What do ISO 14000 and 4-ESS3-1 have in common? Both are standards. The first is a family of standards from the International Organization for Standardization developed in 1996 to “help organizations…minimize how their operations (processes etc.) negatively affect the environment (i.e. cause adverse changes to air, water, or land)…”

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It's down to the wire as I complete the proofs of my upcoming book, Climate Smart & Energy Wise, which Corwin Press will release around the autumnal equinox, September 23—one of two times in the year when day and night are roughly balanced at 50/50—and which also happens to be during

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In which I go to England and am inspired to inject some optimism—and clotted cream—into the climate change discussion. 

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Kentucky state coat of arms, 1876, via Wikimedia Commons

Kentucky’s Education Commissioner Terry Holliday was in the news recently, discussing the treatment of evolution and climate change in the Next Generation Science Standards, which Kentucky’s public schools are scheduled to begin to use in the 2014–2015 school year.

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I’m a pretty enthusiastic person. In casual conversation, I don’t shy away from hyperbole and tend to think a lot of things are “the best thing ever.” But truly, truly, getting a position with NCSE, having my very own NCSE avatar? Best. Thing. Ever.

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A few weeks ago, the Union of Concerned Scientists began its competition to find the most science-friendly President.

In the opening round of the playoffs, which had preselected eight out of the 44 US Presidents, Abe (Lincoln) went head to head with Ike (Dwight David Eisenhower).

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As a few commenters were quick to guess yesterday, a subcommittee of the Kentucky legislature did indeed vote to block adoption of Next Generation Science Standards. On a 5-1 vote, the Administrative Regulation Review Subcommittee sought to overrule the Kentucky Board of Education. The subcommittee tried to wipe away all the hard work that Kentucky’s teachers and scientists invested in creating these standards, along with top scientists and teachers from across the country.

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