Last week on the Fossil Friday, I gave you a delicate crinoid that looked more like a doodle than anything that might have once lived! This week's fossil is similarly deceiving: it looks like a little footprint, but no, it was actually an animal. 

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Last week on Fossil Friday, I gave you a fossil that looked more like embroidery. But in fact, it was a sea creature from the Jurassic—Saccocoma pectinata, aka, a floating crinoid.

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This week's Fossil Friday is so delicate and lovely, it looks almost like I drew it on parchment. But no, these squiggles were left by a sea creature during the late Jurassic. It was found more recently in modern day Germany. There are many relatives of this fellow around today, but who was this ancestral beauty?

Post your answers in the comments section below. Person to identify it first wins bragging rights for the week.

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Last week on Fossil Friday, I gave you a giant jaw to contemplate. Many of the scientists in our office thought for sure it was of reptile origin, but in fact it came from an Eocene mammal!

What kind of mammal could have such a ghastly jaw line? It was from the genus Protitanops, found in what is now Oregon. It sort of looks like a modern day rhinocerous. Yikes! Check out this picture to see what the Protitanops looked like.

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This week's Fossil Friday was a bit of a shocker to me. Looking at the enormous jaw and terrifying teeth, I thought for sure this was some sort of gnarly reptile that would tear you limb from limb, given half a chance.

But no! Upon further investigation, this is the jaw of a mammal dating back to the Eocene. Though common in what is now California, this specimen was found in Oregon.

Any ideas as to what genus this lower jaw came from?

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Photo by Paul Selden

Last week on Fossil Friday, I wove you a web of mystery...two spiders (a lady and a gentleman), only recently correctly identified. Who were these spindly spiders?  Where were they from? In what time period did they live?

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Photo by Paul Selden
 

This week on Fossil Friday, we're unveiling a celebrity fossil! Well, maybe not a celebrity, but it sure has been making news lately. These two spiders (a lady and gentleman) were originally misidentified as another species. What was that species, and what is the new identification? And can you also identify the fossil's geologic period and location?

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A few weeks ago, I gave you a polished slab of coral for Fossil Friday, thinking that the answer would be quite simple! I was told that it was obviously a Permian coral, specifically from the order Rugosa (aka horn coral).

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It's like the ultimate movie monster: invisible, slowly creeping until it rears its ugly head, suddenly lashing out, disguised as dramatic extreme events, growing more powerful and destructive over time. It strikes fear and terror in the populace, causing some to deny its existence and others to weep and wail as they try to warn their friends and neighbors.

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