I came into the office this morning and discovered someone had left mysterious little fossils on my desk. I think I can identify these fossils (although nailing the specific species may be tricky). Can you identify them?

How's that for a little mid-week mystery?

 

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These past few weeks on Fossil Friday, I have focused on bone crushers, biters, and scratchers—but have completely ignored the noble little animals that had their bones crushed...namely, food! 

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A few weeks ago, Patrick Moore, the co-founder of Greenpeace, testified before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee that climate change is not caused by human activity.  Since I am strictly forbidden to write blogs for NCSE entitled, “OMG, WTF?” or ”What kind of nutter sandwiches has this dude been eating?” (apparently that would be rude), I thought I’d point out some of the more illogical statements made in Moore’s testimony.  Let’s be honest: if we can’t have fun with this nonsense, then we will never survive.

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Last week, on the Fossil Friday, I gave you a mandible with promises of more to come. But then I had a sort of lousy, rainy week, and ended up wandering into the Pleistocene and like, wow, forget mandibles! I had a close encounter with some pretty awesome sea life. So apologies to those who had anticipated teeth and jaws and bone-crushers galore: those are on hold! 

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Last week, I shared a mandible and tooth fragment from an animal that I thought many of you would recognize. Many of you quickly surmised it was a canine of some sort, but which one?

This was a Tomarctus sp. in the Canidae family from the Miocene, found in what is now Nevada. From Prehistoric-Wildlife.com:

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This week on the Fossil Friday, I bring you a fossil that might be a little too easy! No, it's not a sloth, but it is a relative of an animal many of you might actually have sitting at your feet right now.

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Photo Credit: King.... via Compfight cc

Last week, I showed you a fossil inspired by my recent trip to Washington, DC. Although the fossil in question came from Washington state. What was it?

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Last week my colleague Mark and I were shipped off to Washington DC for the National Climate Assessment Engagement meeting. DC is one of my favorite towns. Wandering through the National Portrait Museum and the National Archives during the free evenings, I got chills down my spine being surrounded by some of America's fantastic and intriguing history.

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Photo Credit: PeterThoeny via Compfight cc

This past week, I gave you a fossil sea creature that looked more like a footprint than anything else! 

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