Last Sunday's Cosmos took on the related concepts of extinction and climate change, topics I’ve had on my mind since reviewing The Sixth Extinction and interviewing author Elizabeth Kolbert.

+ read

Andrew C. Moore

What is it with the surname Moore? It’s common, of course: the eighteenth most common surname in the United States according to the census results for 2000. Even so, the creationism/evolution controversy seems to attract more than its share of Moores.

+ read
04.29.2014

“Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” by Savile Lumley

How would the creationism-evolution controversy have been different if World War I had never happened? Today the question is answered by Adam Laats, Associate Professor of Education and History at Binghamton University (SUNY). He is the author of The Other School Reformers: Conservative Activism in American Education (forthcoming). He blogs about conservatism, creationism, and education at I Love You but You’re Going to Hell.

+ read

In last Sunday's Cosmos episode, “The Clean Room,” Neil deGrasse Tyson gave one of the most detailed and compelling explanations of how we know the age of the Earth. This predictably made some creationists grumpy.

grand canyon

+ read

THERE’S TOO MUCH TO SAY ABOUT LAST SUNDAY'S EPISODE OF COSMOS.

Steve Newton and I have shared Cosmos reviewing duties, and this week Neil deGrasse Tyson and his team served us an overflowing plate.

+ read
04.24.2014

“Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” by Savile Lumley

How would the creationism-evolution controversy have been different if World War I had never happened? Today the question is answered by Ulrich Kutschera, Professor of Plant Physiology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Kassel. Long involved in efforts to defend the teaching of evolution in Germany against creationist assaults, he is the editor of Kreationismus in Deutschland: Fakten und Analysen (2007).

+ read
04.22.2014

“Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” by Savile Lumley

How would the creationism-evolution controversy have been different if World War I had never happened? Today the question is answered by George E. Webb, Professor of History at Tennessee Tech University and the author of The Evolution Controversy in America (Lexington [KY]: University Press of Kentucky, 1994).

 

 

 

+ read
04.17.2014

“Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” by Savile Lumley

How would the creationism-evolution controversy have been different if World War I had never happened? Today the question is answered by Abraham “Ab” C. Flipse, a historian of science at and the university historian of VU University Amsterdam, whose recent research focuses on the creationism-evolution controversy in the Netherlands.

+ read
04.15.2014

“Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” by Savile Lumley

How would the creationism-evolution controversy have been different if World War I had never happened? Today the question is answered by Adam Shapiro, Lecturer in Intellectual and Cultural History at Birkbeck, University of London, and author of Trying Biology: The Scopes Trial, Textbooks, and Antievolution in American Schools (2013).

+ read
04.10.2014

“Daddy, what did YOU do in the Great War?” by Savile Lumley

How would the creationism-evolution controversy have been different if World War I had never happened? Today the question is answered by Taner Edis. Professor of Physics at Truman State University, Edis is also interested in the creationism-evolution controversy in the Islamic world, which he discusses in a number of articles as well as in his book An Illusion of Harmony: Science and Religion in Islam (2007).

+ read
Subscribe to Creationism