Here at NCSE, we talk a lot about the people who reject climate change science, how they are threatening science education, and what we can do to ensure teachers have the support they need to teach the science. What we don’t always discuss is why people reject climate change.

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If you had two minutes with John S. Watson, the CEO of oil industry giant Chevron, what would you ask? Climate scientist and NCSE Board member Ben Santer recently got that opportunity, when he attended the company’s annual shareholder meeting in San Ramon, California.

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Donald ProtheroIs it possible that Donald Prothero, one winner of NCSE’s 2016 Friend of Darwin award, is actually several tiny paleontologists in a trenchcoat? Consider: His website says that he’s the author of “over 35 books.” That he seems a bit uncertain of the exact count is understandable when you start looking at the publication dates.

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The sun has a much bigger effect on the climate than humans, doesn’t it?

The climate’s always changing. So what?

Won’t animals just adapt to a changing climate?

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Katherine Hayhoe, photo by Ashley Rodgers, Texas Tech UniversityKatherine Hayhoe, photo by Ashley Rodgers, Texas Tech University

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When you think of warriors against science denial, many names probably come to mind. Two of NCSE’s favorites are our 2016 Friend of the Planet award winners: professor John Abraham, and environmental scientist Dana Nuccitelli. Collectively their actions have pushed back against rampant climate change denial and misinformation that is spread voraciously through the media.

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When we got the results back from our national survey of climate change education, the good news jumped out at us. Climate change is actually showing up in schools.

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As you probably know, NCSE released the first national survey on the teaching of climate change in public schools last week in Science. Why did we do this survey? Our executive director, Ann Reid, wrote yesterday in our blog:

“We had anecdotal evidence, and some good, but not national, survey data, suggesting that efforts to cast doubt on the overwhelming scientific evidence of climate change were seeping into science classrooms.”

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