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Track the denialist NIPCC mailing

Around Halloween, thousands of science teachers, science professors, and graduate students received copies of a slick packet attacking climate science.

Tell the Texas board of ed.: Don't mess with textbooks!

The Texas state board of education is preparing to adopt textbooks, and anti-science ideologues want to hijack the process. Creationists and climate change deniers appointed as reviewers by extremists on the board have flooded publishers with demands for corrections of supposed factual errors — corrections that would make the books less accurate. The board of education needs to hear from you at their meeting on Tuesday, September 17.

Next Generation Science Standards for Kentucky

The Kentucky state board of education adopted Next Generation Science Standards this June, preparing the Bluegrass State to replace standards which earned a D in 2012 with a new set of model national standards. Unfortunately, these strong new standards are under attack. The state legislature must approve the new standards, and ideological opponents of evolution and climate education are gearing up. A key vote is expected to come next Wednesday, September 11.

Repeal Louisiana's creationist law

Louisiana's HB 26 would repeal the infamous "Louisiana Science Education Act." That law, passed in 2008 and signed into law by Governor Bobby Jindal, allows teachers in the Pelican State to use classroom supplements, and claims that evolution and climate change create "controversy." This combination invites lessons in creationism and climate change denial. 

Resolution: No nonscience in Tennessee science classes

WHEREAS [name of district / board] agrees with the Tennessee General Assembly’s view, expressed in the preamble to Tenn. Code Ann. § 49-6-1030, that “[a]n important purpose of science education is to inform students about scientific evidence and to help students develop critical thinking skills necessary to become intelligent, productive, and scientifically informed citizens,” and

Sign up to Support Tennessee Science Education

In May, 2012, the Tennessee legislature passed a "Monkey Bill," a law opening the door to the teaching of creationism, climate change denial, and other pseudosciences in the state's classrooms. Thousands of citizens spoke out against it, including the state's top scientists and teachers. The governor even questioned the law, and refused to sign it.

If you agree that local school boards should insist that teachers only teach real science in science classes, and want to be part of fighting back against this law's dangerous effects, please sign up below.

Stop the Kansas climate change denial bill

Kansas's HB 2306 would, if it becomes law, pose a grave threat to students and science education throughout the Sunflower State. This bill is based on legislation in other states which single out evolution, climate change, and other scientific topics as supposedly scientifically "controversial." This bill focuses only on climate change, wrongly claiming it is scientifically controversial.

Protect Missouri public schools from antiscience bills

Missouri's HB 179 and HB 291 would, if they become law, pose a grave threat to students and science education throughout the Show Me State.

Protect Arizona public schools from antiscience bills

Arizona's SB 1213 would, if it becomes law, pose a grave threat to students and science education throughout Arizona. The bill singles out evolution, climate change, and other scientific topics as supposed scientific "controversies," overrides the authority of local districts to establish clear curriculum, undercuts teachers' ability to maintain classroom discipline, and rewrites the rules for science classes, all with the goal of opening the door to creationist lessons.

Take action on Tennessee's Monkey Bill

When Tennessee's legislature debated a "Monkey Bill" in 2012, NCSE joined with concerned citizens to protect science classes. The bill's text singles out evolution and climate change, as if those topics were scientifically controversial, and it blocks school administrators from maintaining a consistent curriculum. It opens the door for creationist parents or students to disrupt classrooms, or for teachers who deny the basic science of climate change to present pseudoscience.

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